Category Archives: Uncategorized

Capturing context – DYP Movie of the week

When digitizing your photos, it’s important to capture any “nearby” information. Dates and notes on slide mounts, writing on the back of prints, notes on boxes and envelopes and other information can help you understand the content  and ownership of the images. It can be time-consuming to stop and transfer these notes to your scans.

In Digitizing Your Photos, I show how I approach the capture of nearby information. The fastest, simplest and most complete way to record these notes is to shoot photos of it, and include those photos in the catalog. In the case of prints, it’s simple to flip the print upside down and shoot the backside. Boxes and folders can also be photographed as you shoot the contents of these containers.

When coping slides, I suggest that you shoot the slides as a group after copying individual slides. Use front light to show any writing, and make sure the light rakes in from one side so that blind embossed writing shows up. This video from Chapter 2 shows the hardware setup I recommend to shoot the slide mounts.

Palm Springs Photo Festival Next Week!

Palm Springs Photo Festival Faculty diner 2014
Palm Springs Photo Festival Faculty diner 2014

I’m headed out again to the wonderful Palm Springs Photo Festival. This is my sixth year as a seminar teacher. And each year, I find it one of the best places to connect with people in the photographic industry. And even more important, it’s a great place to connect with photography itself.

Festival diretor Jeff Dunas manages to bring an amazing line-up of photographers, picture editors, and thought leaders together. (Check the list out below!)  It’s both laid back, and really engaging. A place to recharge and get inspired.

I’ll be doing two seminars. In my Wednesday Lightroom program,  I’ll be showing some of the great new features from Lightroom CC. On Thursday and Friday I’ll be presenting a more general DAM program that includes a lot of new material. I’ll be talking about what’s new, and in particular, how to integrate cloud services into your workflow.

Here’s the faculty list for 2015. This includes people running workshops and Seminars, participating in Symposia, or doing portfolio reviews. It’s a very impressive list

The PSPF 2015 FACULTY

William Allard, Photographer, Author
Daniela Agnelli, Telegraph Magazine, UK
Genaro Arroyo, Market Specialist
Gordon Baldwin, Independent Curator
Anthony Bannon, Executive Director & Research Professor, Burchfield Penny Art Center
Susan Baraz, International Director of Photography, At Edge
Suzee Barrabee, Director of Art and Print Production, Goodby, Silverstein & Partners
Ron Beinner, Senior Photography Producer, Vanity Fair
Sherrie Berger, Photography Consultant, Sherrie Berger Consultancy
Kraige Block, Gallery Director, Throckmorton Fine Art Gallery
Peter Bohler, Photographer
Victoria Brynner, Director, Stardust Visions
Dana Buhl, Curatorial Coordinator, Scottsdale Museum of Contemporary Art
Bonnie Butler Brown, Producer/Sr Art Buyer
Marianne Campbell, Director, Marianne Campbell Associates
Keith Carter, Photographer, Author
Jerry Courvoisier, Photographer / Author
Anna Dickson, Photography Editor
Crista Dix, Director, Wall Space Gallery
McNair Evans, Photographer
David Fahey, Gallery Director, Fahey Klein Gallery, Los Angeles
Deborah Fleming Caffery, Photographer
Mary Fletcher, Photo Editor, Teen Vogue
Taj Forer, Editor, Daylight Magazine
Jeff Frost, Photographer
Susan Getzendanner, Photo Editor, Dwell Magazine
Sonja Gill, Senior Associate Photo Editor, US Weekly
Valerie-Anne Giscard d Estaing, Director, Creative & Editorial, Fine Photographs LLC
Tim Griffith, Photographer
Marta Hallett, President & CEO, Glitterati, Inc.
Jolene Hanson, Director, G2 Gallery
Jillian Harris, Associate Creative Director, Fly Communications Inc.
Ron Haviv, Photographer
Stephanie Heimann, Photo Editor, Fovea Exhibitions
Charlie Hess, Creative Director, Chess Design
Maiza Hixson, Chief Curator, Delaware Center for the Contemporary Arts
Mac Holbert, Co-Founder, Image Collective
Charlie Holland, Consultant
Holly Hughes, Editor, Editor, Photo District News
Peter Hurley, Photographer
Michael Itkoff, Founder, Daylight Magazine
Rupert Jenkins, Executive Director, Colorado Photographic Art Center
Dennis Keeley, Chair of Photography & Imaging, Acuity Press
John Kenney, Owner, JK AND Artist Management
Jennifer Kilberg, Creative Consultant, Fluidvision, Inc.
George Kinghorn, Director & Curator, University of Maine Museum of Art
Laurie Kratochvil, Consultant, Nomad Editions
Peter Krogh, Photographer, Digital Asset Management Guru
Vincent Laforet, Photographer, Filmmaker
Sarah Laird, Agent/Owner, Sarah Laird, Inc.
Jennifer Lamping, Art Producer, Saatchi & Saatchi LA
Patricia Lanza, Director of Talent & Content, The Annenberg Space for Photography
Carol LeFlufy, President, Eye Forward
Emily Leonardo, Senior Agent, Stockland Martel
Leah Levine, Commercial Photography Rep, L2 Agency
Gina Liberto, Photo Editor, New York Times
Karmen Lizzul, Creative Director, Family Circle
Ben Lowy, Photographer
Mary Ellen Mark, Photographer, Author
Karen Marks, Director, Howard Greenberg Gallery
Lisa Matthews, Director of Art Production, Team One Advertising
Michelle Dunn Marsh, Executive Director, Photographic Center NW, Minor Matters Books
Rana Matar, Photographer / Author
Laura McClintock, Assistant Photo Editor, Marie Claire
Shannon McMillan, Senior Art Producer, GSD&M
Karen Meenaghan, Senior Art Producer, Digitas Inc.
Kevin R. Miller, Director, Southeast Museum of Photography
Andrea Modica, Photographer, Author
Robert Morton, President, Robert Morton Books
Janice Moses, Founder / Agent, Janice Moses Represents
David Muench, Photographer / Author
Mark Murrmann, Photo Editor, Mother Jones Magazine
Frank W. Ockenfels 3, Photographer / Educator / Author
Lisa Oropallo, VP/Director of Art Production, 76
Chris Pichler, Publisher, Nazraeli Press
Alex Ramos, Leica Gallery SF
Jodi Rappaport, Director, The Rappaport Agency
Chris Reed, Copyright Lawyer
Renee Rhyner, Owner, Renee Rhyner & Co.
Sari Rowe, Art Buying Supervisor, Rubin Postaer & Associates (RPA)
Alice Sachs Zimet, President, Arts + Business Partners LLC
Dana Salvo, Director, Clark Gallery
Deborah Sandidge, Photographer, Author
Barry Schwartz, Photographer
Sarah Silberg, Wired Magazine
Mark Seliger, Photographer, Author
Karen Sinsheimer, Curator of Photography, Santa Barbara Museum of Art
Monica Siwiec, Photo Editor, Real Simple
Michelle Stark, Photo Editor, The Hollywood Reporter
Amanda Sosa Stone, Creative Consultant, Agency Access
Art Streiber, Photographer
Jock Sturges, Photographer, Author
Elisabeth Sunday, Photographer / Author
Mary Virginia Swanson, Consultant/Educator/Author
Lena Tabori, Founder, Welcome Enterprises
Barbara Tannenbaum, Curator, Cleveland Museum of Art
Lisa Volpe, Curator Wichita Art Museum
Judy Walgren, Director of Photography, San Francisco Chronicle
Rex Weiner, Market Specailist, A&I Photographic And Digital Services
Colin Westerbeck, Curator, Independent Curator
Ross Whitaker, President, RW Studio Inc.
Matika Wilbur, Photographer
Dan Winters, Photographer / Author
Tracey Woods, Associate Photo Editor, Essence Magazine
Kenneth Zane, Senior Art Producer, Leo Burnett Agency

Sustainable Photography in a Disintermediated Era

Here’s a little more about our panel presentation on Saturday at SXSW. This is an extension of conversations I’ve been having with my three other panelists for years.

SXSW Program Announcement
It’s a dog-eat-dog world out there

The Panel
Mikkel Aaland is our moderator. I’ve known Mikkel for about 15 years, and we’ve had the pleasure of working on a number of projects together. We’ve both been involved with Adobe and ASMP since the last century.  I was part of the Lightroom Adventure book projects in Iceland and Tasmania that Mikkel created, and Mikkel invited me to the Nordic Light Beyond Pixels Unfestival two years ago.

Krogh_130423_9676

Mikkel is a poster child for embracing change and thriving on disruption. Coming from his roots as a traditional photographer, he was an early digital pioneer. He’s written and photographed many books – some about digital tech, some about ancient technologies, and some that are just about people.

AnnaAnna Dickson is the former Director of Photography for the Huffington Post/AOL, and now deputy Director of Photography at the Wall Street Journal. She also came out of a traditional photo background as a photo editor for major magazines back in the film days.

Anna has also embraced change with gusto. She has done extensive development with the Huffington Post tech team to develop an enterprise DAM system. And she has kept the pulse of nearly every new photo startup claiming to provide the firehose of content needed by online publishers. And she has been able to put them to the acid test – can they actually deliver.

Anna and I have shared the stage twice before: at PhotoPlus in 2013 and at last spring’s Palm Springs Photo Festival. Although we get to take opposing perspectives on stage, we’re good friends with broad agreement about where the future of media is going.

leoraLeora Kornfeld was introduced to me by our mutual friend Eric Drysdale, with whom she shares comedy roots. She has a long background in traditional media, including radio work for the CBC.

When we met over Facebook a few years ago, Leora was working as a Research Affiliate at the Berkman Center for Internet and Society at Harvard. She’s been studying the effects of the fragmentation of traditional media entities. We hit it off immediately, and spent a lot of time comparing the experience of the practitioner (me) with the analysis of the academic (her).

Our Presentation
We’ll be looking at the effects of shifting market forces on the independent photographer. It seems as though everything about the way photographers built their businesses has changed. Media companies are in turmoil. The tools and methods of the trade have changed radically. The availability of crowd-sourced images has eroded some markets completely. And people’s concept of a photograph’s value is all over the map.

How do we carve out a place in this tumultuous ecosystem? Well, there are some ways forward, and we’ll look at them from each of our different perspectives – photographer, client, academic. While the way forward is not clear, and certainly contains risks, we think we can help identify strategies that can work.

Our panel comes at the end of a day-long track that presents pieces of the very same changing landscape. what is the historical context, how are big media companies coping with the issues, how does social media push new norms legally and socially, and how are new hardware and software developments going to affect us?

I’ll post some of the more promising ideas here, as well as some of the new stuff I run across. Like the SXSW of the last two years, I expect it to be a fertile place to see how photography, technology, media and culture move forward.

Free Webinar Today

I’ll be doing another webinar today for PhotoShelter (4-5pm, EST June 25, 2014). This one will explore the Storage part of Store, Tag, Create.  Here are some of the topics I’ll cover:

  • Primary storage vs. Backup storage
  • Cloning your drives
  • NAS and the personal cloud
  • Cloud storage services
  • Using SSD for speed, upgrading your current computer
  • Where you’re money should go: drive speeds vs. interface types
  • Hard drive health and safety
  • Best configurations for location work
  • And more!

 

Screen Shot 2014-06-25 at 1.06.11 PM

I’m leaving room in the presentation to take some questions from the audience. Thanks to PhotoSelter for making the webinar possible. You can find my last webinar about photo library organization here.

 

Backblaze saves College Student’s Data

Dateline Chicago – DePaul University Freshman Madeline Krogh suffered an unexpected computer mishap this week when a pitcher of water was accidentally poured into her new Macbook Pro computer. She was heard at the time to exclaim “Oh, $&!#!” The computer was significantly damaged and had to be sent off to Apple for a repair estimate, and possible replacement.

Maddy-2 All of the data on Ms. Krogh’s computer was recovered due to the forward thinking of her father, Peter Krogh, who had subscribed her computer to Backblaze. The cloud-based service does a continual backup of the entire hard drive to the Backblaze server through Ms. Krogh’s wireless internet connection.

 

Madeline Krogh shows off her new temporary semi-waterproof “computer.”

When asked about the installation of Backblaze, Mr. Krogh said,” I had given her a backup drive to use with Time Machine, but the odds of that happening on a regular basis are, um, slim. She’s a smart kid, but she does not do backups. You’d think the daughter of the guy who wrote the book on data preservation might be a little more tuned in to this possibility. But noooooo.”

Once the extent of the damage was apparent, Mr. Krogh was able to go online and check the status of the backup. To his relief, it was up-to-date, despite zero attention to the process by Ms. Krogh. He was even able to find a copy of the assignment due that afternoon. The document had not been saved properly, but Microsoft Word’s autosave had automatically created a version and BackBlaze stored the document. The assignment was recovered, emailed to Ms. Krogh, and turned in on time.

Ms. Krogh has offered to help pay the cost of repair or replacement of the computer, and has acknowledged that her dad is totally awesome. Mr. Krogh, in turn, has acknowledged that his daughter is kicking ass in her grades, and has earned the right to make a mistake or two.

 

Platforms and Channels

As you think about the use of social media to promote your business, it’s helpful to make a distinction between Platforms and Channels. Platforms are foundational. You build upon them, using the tools they offer to implement your communication strategy. A channel is a means of communication or distribution. You need to be much more careful about the services you use as platforms compared to those which are simply channels. So what does this mean in practical terms? Let’s take Facebook as an example.

Krogh_120514_5025Sometimes you see a platform, sometimes you see a channel.  Chegdu, 2012

If you use Facebook’s email system to communicate with your clients, and you use Facebook’s servers to store your portfolio, then you are using it like a platform. It becomes a foundation of your business marketing efforts. The longer it goes on, the more “married” you are to the platform. It may be difficult or impossible to disentangle yourself from the platform if the service goes away, or becomes objectionable.

You could also use Facebook more like a channel. You could use your own email address, and upload your photos to your own website and then link them to your Facebook page. This strategy takes advantage of Facebook as a great viral marketing tool, without giving the company so much leverage over your business. And it lets you develop other channels with much more control. You can move to Google Plus, or Twitter or PhotoShelter or some future service that’s not even developed yet if it suits you. This prevents lock-in, and alows you to create a reach that’s even larger.

As we have cranked up DAM Useful Publishing, we’ve used the distinction between platforms and channels and the concept of Lock-in to help understand other decisions. The Amazon platform is the most powerful retail force in the world. They have a turnkey publishing platform that makes getting to market really easy. But that power can work against you. The percentage that Amazon demands and their well-documented bullying practices make them a poor choice for a platform partnership. Instead, we’re looking at them as one of several retail channels.

As with all technology choices, it’s helpful to play a little “what if?” If leaving Facebook or Amazon is unthinkable because of the way you are using it today, then it’s time to start using it in a new way. Develop a strategy that enables you to own as much of your platform as possible, while making great use of any available channels.

This post was adapted from one first published on ASMP’s Strictly Business blog. It was written in advance of the panel discussion I will moderate at PhotoPlus on Safe Social Media Practices.

The DAM Global Village

Since we opened the doors to DAM Useful Publishing in July 2013, we have had an awesome (in the true sense of the word) international reach. We have sold books and eBooks to people in 32 countries. DAM Useful is reaching a true global village. It’s really amazing to me to see how far my work has gone.

In this list, it’s possible to see the the power of an individual to reach an audience directly and the popularity of digital photography. Thanks, Internet. I’ve only set foot in a little over half of these places, but I see a wish list forming…

Arab EmiratesKrogh_120424_1878
Argentina
Australia
Austria
Belgium
Brazil
Canada
China
Colombia
Czechoslovakia
Denmark
Finland
France
Germany
Great Britain
Greece
Hong Kong
Hungary
Ireland
Italy
Japan
Mexico
Netherlands
New Zealand
Norway
Portugal
Russia
Singapore
South Africa
Spain
Sweden
United States

Help Wanted

New digital publishing company seeks design and production help

DAM Useful publishing is really taking off, and we need to hire some freelance help, possibly leading to full-time employment in the near future. Listed below is our Help Wanted description. Ideally, we are looking for someone who is interested in doing everything below, but we are willing to split the job into several part.

Krogh_080313_5726

Established author writing about digital photography, digital asset management and Adobe Lightroom has started a new publishing company creating multimedia digital publications primarily for direct sale. Although we’re new, we are experiencing a steep growth curve.

Continue reading Help Wanted

Lightroom Workshop Feb 6, Evening Presentation Feb 5

I’m doing a Lightroom Workshop February 6 at my studio in Kensington, MD. This one is sponsored by ASMP, so it’s a little less expensive than my normal program, although it’s just as action-packed.

Here’s the sign-up.

Also, on the evening of February 5, I’m doing a shorter program at the CDIA in Georgetown.

Here’s where you sign up for that one.

lightroom2

Complete description after the jump
Continue reading Lightroom Workshop Feb 6, Evening Presentation Feb 5

Lightroom Workshops December 11 and 12

We’ve just announced some new Lightroom workshops to take place at Peter Krogh Studio in Kensington MD. The first workshop, December 11, will be an introduction to Lightroom. The second one, December 12th, will be an intermediate and advanced workflow tune-up.

Introduction to Lightroom
In the Introduction to Lightroom workshop, we’ll show how to get started with Lightroom. You’l learn how to set up your computer to get the most out of the program in the safest and most efficient way.

Sign-up and additional information here 

Intermediate and Advanced Workflow Tune-up
In our second workshop, you’ll learn more advanced techniques, taking advantage of some of the more powerful features of the software. This is also a great workshop for anyone who is upgradfing from an earlier version of the software and wants to know how the new develop module is different from the old one.

Sign-up and additional information here

Each workshop runs from 9-5, costs $200/day and includes lunch. Discounts available for past attendees at Krogh Studio workshops, ASMP and APA members, as well as multi-day attendees and those who want to bring their assistants.

Email for discount details.