Category Archives: How to

Remove Silvering – DYP Movie of the Week

This post kicks off a series of tips and techniques from Digitizing Your Photos. These posts will focus on  a particular technique from the multimedia eBook, and include one of the videos from the book.

It’s common for vintage prints to exhibit Silver Mirroring (or Silvering). The reflections caused by residual silver can obscure the shadow detail in the print. Fortunately, it’s easy to remove the mirroring in the copy photo through the use of simple cross-polarization. This video shows how to cross-polarize and what the effect looks like.

This video appears on page 48 of Digitizing Your Photos with Your Camera and Lightroom.

Digitizing Your Photos – Just Released

We’re excited about the release of our new multimedia ebook, Digitizing Your Photos. It presents a comprehensive method for scanning photos with a digital camera, and managing the process with Lightroom.

The book is written for professional photographers, family historians, corporate collection managers, and cultural heritage institutions. We know that great collections of slides, prints and negatives are everywhere, and we want to help preserve and make use of them.

The book runs for 248 pages, and includes 90 workflow videos for a total of 9 hours of comprehensive instruction.


Here’s the first video from the book, which outlines the entire process.

And here’s the product page.

PhotoShelter Webinar tomorrow on OYP with Lightroom

UPDATE: The Webinar is full.
I’m very happy to be bringing my Lightroom organizational philosophy of Store, Tag and Create to PhotoShelter’s popular webinar series tomorrow, Friday February 21st at 4:00pm. I’ll spend some time laying out the foundations of an organized photo library in Lightroom.

PhotoshelterPresentationPhotoShelter provides smart web services for professional photographers and others working with professional imagery. They’ve been focused on making a great service, creating tools to promote, deliver and sell imagery for a decade. For many photographers I know, PhotoShelter provides a turnkey storefront that just keeps getting better. You can see how I use PhotoShelter Beam for my portfolio here.

PhotoShelter has become one of the premier photo education entities in the world, and it’s not even their core business. They understand that professional development benefits the entire community, and they’ve been committed to creating informative white papers, webinars, live presentations and more. I’m very happy to be a part of that effort.

If you can’t make it Friday, you can check out the webinar on-demand.

This video shows how Beam works, and I think it’s a really well-done demonstration. I actually made my new portfolio site using the video below as the only guide. (I also used Lightroom’s Publish Services to upload and update the photos, and I show you how to do that in Organizing Your Photos.)

On The Photoshop Show!

Last week I was on the Photoshop Show with Jan Kabili and Ron Clifford, talking about my new book, Organizing Your Photos with Lightroom 5. I run through a bunch of the most important concepts in the book. Thanks also to my friend Sean Duggan, as well as Erika Thornes and Dave Bell for sitting in.  It was a fun show (after a little bit of a rough start) that covered a lot of ground. I hope to do it again before too long.

Multi-Catalog Tip – Set Identity Plate

Here’s a tip from my new book. It’s a simple technique, but not everyone thinks to do it. If you use more than one catalog in Lightroom, you’ll want to create a custom Identity Plate that can show you which catalog you’re working in.  This can prevent you from accidentally importing personal images into a jobs catalog, for instance.

Setting the identity plate is easy and it’s outlined in the movie linked below. For more information on multi-catalgo workflow with Lightroom, check out the new book.

Using Multiple Lightroom Catalogs

When you use multiple catalogs in Lightroom, it’s important to be clear about why you are splitting your collection and what you hope to accomplish. In my new book, I outline the most common of these reasons so you can create a purpose-driven workflow. Most people’s workflow will fall into one of the following groups:

Multiple Master Catalogs
Project and Master Catalogs
Working and Archive Catalogs
Synchronized Catalogs
Satellite Catalogs.

Each of these workflows has a dedicated chapter outlining the goals and how to achieve them. The following video helps you understand what each of these configurations includes.

 

New Lightroom 5 eBook available soon

I’ve been hard at work this spring on a new eBook covering some advanced Lightroom 5 workflows. The book is called Multi-Catalog Workflow with Lightroom 5. This multimedia book outlines how to create multi-catalog and multi-computer workflows with Lightroom 5. It provides a thorough exploration of the tools and methods that are useful in a multi-catalog workflow. It also shows you how to combine these techniques into purpose-driven workflows that solve real-world problems.

This ebook is a true multimedia hybrid, employing the techniques pioneered by my friend D J Clark. Video is used where it’s most appropriate – to demonstrate workflow sequences in action.  It is accompanied by text that provides context for the workflow, as well as a list of steps that you can refer to as you put the workflow into practice.

I’m publishing this eBook directly, The book will be available in PDF form so it can be played on a computer, and it will also come in ePub form for use on a tablet.

Release is expected in June 2013.

Okay so it took a little longer. It’s available now.

You’re going to need a bigger boat…

I got my D800 today, and I feel a bit like Roy Scheider in Jaws after he saw the size of the shark.  The files that come out of this camera are huge and remarkably good.  The 36 megapixels are also pushing the envelope of all of the rest of my equipment.

Lenses
The camera is so sharp that it is showing focus falloff where my D700 did not. Even great modern lenses like the 14-24 are showing signs of image imperfections that I have never seen before.  I suppose I’ll need to test all of my lenses and see which ones are up to using on this camera.  I also expect that I’ll need to test them at all apertures.

There’s a potential limits of diffraction problem with this kind of pixel density.


Lonaconing Silk Mill, Lonaconing, MD 60mm Micro Nikkor @ f/8
Click here for the Zoomify version 

Cards
I’m getting 175 images on an 8 GB CF card. That’s going to go quickly. I have a bunch of much larger SD cards (32 GB), but they are slower.  Again, it looks like I’ll be doing some testing here.  I want first to see if any of the cards will produce a slowdown in shooting speed as they struggle to keep up with the data writing. After that, I’ll want to see what download times are for the various cards.  This will certainly be important in the field.

Hard Drives
I’ll be filling these up much faster with 40-50 MB raw files (14 bit, lossless compressed). This will certainly mean new portable drives for my upcoming trip to China, as well as for any extended location shoot.  And the archive drives will also be filling up faster, so there’s another purchase there as well.

Computer
These files are big, and process slowly. I have a feeling I’m going to need as much speed as I can get. New iMac?  New Macbook Pro?  Not sure.

Web publishing technology
There’s also a need to be able to view these images over the web. Photoshop has come with something called Zoomify – linked here – that can help with this.  But there’s some new technology called Piqsure that does this with HTML5 in some pretty cool ways.  More on that soon.