Category Archives: How to

Rail Systems for Rent or Sale

UPDATE: We’ve decided to offer a limited number of these units for sale. We’re rolling these out at a price of $300. We’re taking preorders now. Contact us at support@theDAMbook.com


A lot of readers are asking how to get a rail system for 35mm slide and negative copying. I’m working on some sourcing options for this. In the meantime, we’re going to offer the units that I personally own as rental items.

What we can provide

The rental is for a rail, a film stage, a generic camera plate if needed, and step down ring to allow your lens to connect to the shade if needed (These units have a 52mm lens connection.)

These units have had the rounded corners filed down to show the full frame of the image. You’ll get a natural black border on standard 35mm film.

Here’s an example of a negative scanned with a rail system and turned positive with the techniques outlined in my new book. The black border is created in-camera and shows the entire frame of the image. Note that each different unit will produce a slightly different black border. 

Rail System Options

We have several styles of unit, all made from Nikon slide copy adapters. Some have the rear diffusion glass, and in some the glass has been removed.
• Without diffusion – this requires that you have a nice even light source such as a softbox or lightbox. Shooting without diffusion means there is no chance of dust particles sticking to the glass and appearing in every shot.
• With diffusion – This will make it easier for some people to make a smooth and even illumination across the frame.

Nikon PB-6 and PS-6

I also have a Nikon Bellows unit for rent. To use this, you need a full frame small body Nikon camera (e.g. D750, D800, D810, D600, D610, D700) and a 55mm or a 60mm Nikon Macro lens.

D1, D2, D3, D4, And D5 cameras do not fit on these units.

What you need

You’ll need your own camera and macro lens, as well as a light source (strobe or LED recommended). YOUR CAMERA DOES NOT HAVE TO BE A NIKON.

Camera – Rail systems can be used with any brand or model of camera.

Lens – In order to connect the lens shade, you’ll need to use a “normal” length macro lens. This means a 50mm-60mm range for full frame DSLR and 35mm range for APS-C or micro 4/3 camera.

Digitizing Your Photos – It is strongly recommended to have a copy of my most recent book in order to get the most out of your rental. Shown below is a video from the book.

Terms

Rental is $50/week, or $150/month. You pay shipping both ways (we prefer if you can provide a Fedex or UPS account number.) When we send the unit out, we need to take a credit card deposit for $300.

If you are interested in rental, drop us a line at support@theDAMbook.com or make a Facebook comment below. Let us know whether you want a Rail or bellows system, whether you want the diffuser or not, and how soon you’re looking to get started.

 

 

 

 

Film Copy Setup – DYP Movie of the Week

The easiest way to build a copy setup for film (slides, transparencies and negatives) is to lay a lightbox on the copy stand and then put a negative carrier on top of that. This video from Digitizing Your Photos shows you how set one of these up (including how to make sure that the camera and the film are parallel to each other.)

I cover several other setups for copying film in the book, but this one requires no special tools and can be made wth stuff that is commonly available at camera shops.

Remove Silvering – DYP Movie of the Week

This post kicks off a series of tips and techniques from Digitizing Your Photos. These posts will focus on  a particular technique from the multimedia eBook, and include one of the videos from the book.

It’s common for vintage prints to exhibit Silver Mirroring (or Silvering). The reflections caused by residual silver can obscure the shadow detail in the print. Fortunately, it’s easy to remove the mirroring in the copy photo through the use of simple cross-polarization. This video shows how to cross-polarize and what the effect looks like.

This video appears on page 48 of Digitizing Your Photos with Your Camera and Lightroom.

Digitizing Your Photos – Just Released

We’re excited about the release of our new multimedia ebook, Digitizing Your Photos. It presents a comprehensive method for scanning photos with a digital camera, and managing the process with Lightroom.

The book is written for professional photographers, family historians, corporate collection managers, and cultural heritage institutions. We know that great collections of slides, prints and negatives are everywhere, and we want to help preserve and make use of them.

The book runs for 248 pages, and includes 90 workflow videos for a total of 9 hours of comprehensive instruction.


Here’s the first video from the book, which outlines the entire process.

And here’s the product page.

PhotoShelter Webinar tomorrow on OYP with Lightroom

UPDATE: The Webinar is full.
I’m very happy to be bringing my Lightroom organizational philosophy of Store, Tag and Create to PhotoShelter’s popular webinar series tomorrow, Friday February 21st at 4:00pm. I’ll spend some time laying out the foundations of an organized photo library in Lightroom.

PhotoshelterPresentationPhotoShelter provides smart web services for professional photographers and others working with professional imagery. They’ve been focused on making a great service, creating tools to promote, deliver and sell imagery for a decade. For many photographers I know, PhotoShelter provides a turnkey storefront that just keeps getting better. You can see how I use PhotoShelter Beam for my portfolio here.

PhotoShelter has become one of the premier photo education entities in the world, and it’s not even their core business. They understand that professional development benefits the entire community, and they’ve been committed to creating informative white papers, webinars, live presentations and more. I’m very happy to be a part of that effort.

If you can’t make it Friday, you can check out the webinar on-demand.

This video shows how Beam works, and I think it’s a really well-done demonstration. I actually made my new portfolio site using the video below as the only guide. (I also used Lightroom’s Publish Services to upload and update the photos, and I show you how to do that in Organizing Your Photos.)

On The Photoshop Show!

Last week I was on the Photoshop Show with Jan Kabili and Ron Clifford, talking about my new book, Organizing Your Photos with Lightroom 5. I run through a bunch of the most important concepts in the book. Thanks also to my friend Sean Duggan, as well as Erika Thornes and Dave Bell for sitting in.  It was a fun show (after a little bit of a rough start) that covered a lot of ground. I hope to do it again before too long.

Multi-Catalog Tip – Set Identity Plate

Here’s a tip from my new book. It’s a simple technique, but not everyone thinks to do it. If you use more than one catalog in Lightroom, you’ll want to create a custom Identity Plate that can show you which catalog you’re working in.  This can prevent you from accidentally importing personal images into a jobs catalog, for instance.

Setting the identity plate is easy and it’s outlined in the movie linked below. For more information on multi-catalgo workflow with Lightroom, check out the new book.

Using Multiple Lightroom Catalogs

When you use multiple catalogs in Lightroom, it’s important to be clear about why you are splitting your collection and what you hope to accomplish. In my new book, I outline the most common of these reasons so you can create a purpose-driven workflow. Most people’s workflow will fall into one of the following groups:

Multiple Master Catalogs
Project and Master Catalogs
Working and Archive Catalogs
Synchronized Catalogs
Satellite Catalogs.

Each of these workflows has a dedicated chapter outlining the goals and how to achieve them. The following video helps you understand what each of these configurations includes.