Category Archives: Announcements

My SXSW proposal – Small Photos, Big Data: A Connectivity Manifesto

It’s Panel Picker time again! Please take a moment and vote for my  session proposal for SXSW 2019. Once again, I’ve teamed up with Anna Dickson to explore the use of visual media and the data that is connected to it.

Small Photos, Big Data: A Connectivity Manifesto

On the mobile web, images serve a greater purpose than simple visual description. Rich media images are increasingly used to connect people, events, institutions, ideas, advocacy and commerce. As we move into a new era of visual communication, this trend is accelerating. While the use of connected images blossomed on social media services, it reaches far beyond walled gardens into API-based interchange on the open web. Machine learning and linked data are creating new methods to make connections, and the Data Transfer Project is opening up access to the underlying graph for portability and innovation. In this presentation, we will explore the current state of visual media connectivity, what it can do for you, how to enhance your own image connectivity, and how to avoid costly mistakes.

Adobe Max – A great conference for visual creators

I’ll be headed to Los Angeles in mid-October for Adobe Max, my third time there.  Over the last several years, the conference has grown like crazy, including the addition of a lot of photo-related programming. In each of the years I’ve attended the conference, I walked away with a much better understanding of the emerging media landscape.
Here is a highlight video from 2017. It gives you a peek at the type of content at Adobe Max.

There is a fascinating mix of programming at Max. There are breakout presentations, workshops, pre-conference multi-day workshops, and plenary sessions. The big plenary sessions are the ones that were most interesting to me, including inspirational talks from Annie Griffiths, and Jonathan Adler.If you are interested in where Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning is going, Max provides a showcase for Adobe’s massive undertaking, Sensei. Sensei is purpose-built for the creative, marketing and communication industries, and it is poised to have far-ranging effects on the way visual media is created and deployed.

The Sneaks are a look at experimental development efforts, including products that are still on the drawing board. Always fun and popular, and hosted by a people like Nick Offerman or  Kumail Nanjiani.As you can see, there is a lot of the content available on free video channels. So why go? Like all good conferences, the value is frequently found in the personal connections you make rather than strictly in the programming. And in the best conferences, you open your mind with new programming at the same time you are making connections with new people.

There’s also a pretty good party at the end of the thing, usually including good live music, a ton of great food and drink, along with other fun and games.

Max is not cheap – list price is $1595, and the discounted price of $1295 is only available until July 31. I have still not cracked the code to get a presenter slot at Max, but this year I’m going as a TA. I’ll help out someone’s classes, learn, and meet new people. If you are looking for a hint of what the future of media will bring, I suggest you give Max a try.

The DAM Book 3.0 Index

We’ve created an index for The DAM Book 3.0. While this was not terribly necessary for electronic versions of the book, it’s quite helpful for the print version (at the printer now – expected delivery before the end of July).I’ve never personally created an index before, so this was a learning experience for me. It ended up being a tremendous amount of work – maybe 50 hours of combing through the book, making entries, organizing information and then reorganizing it.

If you have already bought the PDF, you’ll soon get an announcement of the update along with a download link. If you don’t have a copy of the book, the index will give you a very good idea of the breadth and depth of the content it includes.

Here’s a PDF of the Index. You can click the top right to see it full screen, or download it onto your computer.

Download (PDF, 4.12MB)

Digitizing Your Photos Webinar posted

Last fall, I did a presentation at B&H on using your camera as a scanner, based on my book Digitizing Your Photos. The webinar proved a pretty detailed overview of the camera scanning process for prints, slides and negatives. For those unfamiliar with the process, or for people who have been struggling to get high quality scans, there is a lot of good information in here.

The DAM Book 3.0 released

It is with great pleasure that we can announce the release of the full digital version of The DAM Book 3.0. In the nine years since the last version was published, our use of visual media has become marked by increasing connectivity – between images, people, data, applications and web services. The new book helps you understand this connectivity and how to evaluate which tools are right for you.

The change in covers between TDB2 and TDB3 help to illustrate the differences between the versions. In 2009, it was fine to think about collection management as “a big ball of my stuff.” In our connected world, that’s not enough. Your image collection will connect to other people, images, services, applications, ideas and information. You will also probably have additional satellite collections on other devices or services. And, yes, like Tinkertoys, these connections often plug into each other in standardized ways. 


In the new book, I’ve laid out the elements of the connected media ecosystem. We’re seeing connection and integration in  all aspects of the way we make and use images. Connectivity is often born into an image at the moment of capture, and increases as your images move through the lifecycle. Almost everything that hosts or touches your images has some type of connection.

The new world of cloud and mobile workflow are impacting every part of the way we manage and make use of images. File formats, storage, backup and metadata are evolving to incorporate these new capabilities. I’ve rewritten the book from the ground-up so that connectivity is built in to each topic.

Of course, connectivity is not the only change that has come to digital media over the last nine years. The use and importance of photography has expanded dramatically, and anyone who wants to understand how visual media works can find important context in this book.

The DAM Book 3.0 Release 2

Dateline – Athens, Georgia – We’ve released the next set of chapters for The DAM Book 3.0, adding 325 more pages to the initial Chapter 1 release, for a total of 363 pages. These chapters cover some of the most fundamental and important parts of image management.
Chapters released today include:

  • Image Objects and File Formats – a discussion of the evolution of digital images and the formats used to embody them.
  • How Metadata Works – A deep dive into the nuts and bolts of modern metadata.
  • Using Metadata – a guide to the effective use of metadata to achieve goals that are important to you.
  • Logical Structure – discussion of the different types of file systems that we now use (computer, mobile, cloud, NAS) and a file and folder strategy for each of these.
  • Digital Storage Hardware – a comprehensive look at the current storage options for your digital media.
  • Backup, Restoration and Verification – preservation of your archive requires you to think of these processes as part of a unified system.

Anyone who has purchased the pre-release copy should have gotten an email with instructions for downloading the new version. And if you have not ordered yet, you can still get in on the 10% pre-release discount. The discount runs until the release of the final version, scheduled for the end of April.

Huge thanks to the DAM Useful production team for their Herculean effort in getting this release out on time. Elinore Wrigley of Me Jayne Design Cape Town, South Africa, Dominique le Roux of Moonshine Media, Vientiane, Laos and Bobbi Kittner of Kittner Design, Takoma Park, Maryland did another outstanding job.

Special thanks to Josie Krogh and Steve Thomas for letting us set up an Athens, GA field office for the final push.

The DAM Book 3.0 now available for pre-order!

We are pleased to announce that The DAM Book 3.0 is now available for pre-order! As with our previous books, you can pre-order the book for at a discount.

Here are the details:

  • Electronic book:  Regular price $34.95
  • Pre-order discount price:  $31.46
  • All pre-orders will get an advance copy of Chapter 1, Visually Speaking at the time of purchase.
  • We will deliver at least 7 of the additional 11 chapters by March 31st, 2018.
  • Additional chapters will deliver in April 2018.
(Click for larger view)

Print Copies
Print copies will be available over the summer. Your purchase of an electronic copy can be applied to a print copy, once it’s available.
More Info: Click The DAM Book 3.0 product page here.

Upcoming Appearances

I’ve got a number of appearances scheduled for the coming months. Here’s a list, followed by a link to an interview I did with Photofocus.

APPO Raleigh, NC March 21-24
I’ll be giving a general session at the Association of Professional Photo Organizers on the use of Artificial Intelligence in asset management, as well as a breakout session on using your camera as a scanner.
APPO is an organization for people who help (mostly) private individuals scan, tag, preserve and make use of their photographic legacies. More info here. 


Palm Springs Photo Festival
I’m thrilled to be headed back to Palm Springs for the 2018 festival. I’ll be doing two programs. The first is Wednesday, May 9th program on scanning with your camera and the second is What’s new in DAM program on May 10th. More Info here.


Maine Media Workshops
I’ll be giving a week-long workshop on managing your mage collection with Lightroom the week of June 10th. I’ve never taught here, but I’m really excited to give it a whirl. I know a number of people who have had life-changing experiences at the workshop. More info here. 


Available now! – Web Interview on PhotoFocus
I had a really enjoyable hour speaking with Rich Harrington, Tim Grey and Kevin Ames about getting organized. The interview has been archived and you can find it here. 

Update on DAM Book 3

It is with a healthy dose of chagrin that I report that the publication of The DAM Book 3 will be postponed yet again. I have been working on the book full time for the last three months (and quite a bit before that), and it is simply taking a long time to get it done properly.

When I announced an outline and publication date in early September, I was assuming that I could reuse as much as 40% of the copy in the book. As it currently stands, that number is hovering at close to 1%. Changes in the digital photography ecosystem and in the book’s scope  have driven a need to rewrite everything.

Not only has the rewriting been time consuming, but the changes in imaging and associated technologies has required a lot of research. I’ve been chasing down a lot of details on topics like artificial intelligence and machine learning, new technologies like depth mapping, and the state of the art in emerging metadata standards. It’s been a lot more work than I anticipated.

We saw a couple late-breaking changes that have been very important to include in the book. October’s release of a cloud-native version of Lightroom helps to complete the puzzle of where imaging and media management

Complicating matters, I’m going in for ankle replacement surgery in early December. I’ll be finishing the book while my leg is healing. But the pace at which I can work while recuperating is unknown, so I’m not prepared to make another announcement about publication dates.

In the end, I’ve had to choose between hitting a deadline and making the book be as good as possible. I’ve opted for quality.

Sneak Peek blog posts

I’ve been working with my editor to identify and publish content from the new book as we continue in production. The first series of these posts will provide some insight on Computational Tagging, a subject I first posted about last month.

ICYMI – D850 scan test results

Last month I published the results of my tests of the Nikon D850 “negative digitizer” on PetaPixel. Judging by the dialog and web traffic, a lot of people saw it.  I’m putting up a short synopsis here, along with a link for those who missed it.

The bottom line: great camera for scanning, digitizer not ready yet.

The Nikon D850 is a truly wonderful camera for scanning photographs as I outline in my book Digitizing Your Photos. It offers a significant bump in resolution over the Nikon D800 which I have been using. If you are looking for the highest quality camera scan from a 35mm style DSLR, then the D850 would be an excellent choice (as would the Canon 5DSR, or the Sony a7r II mirrorless).

The camera includes a “negative digitizer” feature which can flip B&W and color negatives into positives in the camera. In theory, this could provide some real workflow advantages over manual conversion. However, there are some problems in the current implementation. Here they are in brief:

  • Clips highlights and shadows too aggressively
  • Can only shoot JPEG, which means highlights and shadows not recoverable
  • Exposure compensation and contrast control disabled in digitizer feature
  • Uncontrolled variation between frames means that batch corrections are not possible

Blown highlights were a particular problem with flash photos. Because they are JPEG files, they are not recoverable. 

Here are two images from the same negative strip. As you can see, the color is rendered very differently. This makes it impossible to batch correct with a consistent look. 

Nikon’s unofficial response

At the PhotoPlus Expo, I got a chance to have an extended dialog with Nikon representatives. They had seen the PetaPixel article and understood the issues I raised. More important, they indicated that it’s essential to fix these problems. I left the meetings with the impression that there would be a concerted effort by the Nikon USA staff to address these problems.

When I hear back from Nikon, I’ll be sure to post an update on the situation. In the meantime, if you are interested in using your D850 (or any other camera) as a scanner, the best methodology is outlined in my newest book, Digitizing Your Photos.

Digitizing Your photos - a guide to photo scanning with a digital camera
Scanning your photos with a digital camera – a comprehensive guide by Peter Krogh