Tag Archives: feature

What the Equifax Breach tells us about cloud security

Equifax reports an intrusion into its system which “may have” stolen the data on up to 143 million Americans, including name, address, SS#, and Drivers license number. This is a terrible lapse in security, and, on paper, it should not have happened.

Equifax is a large and profitable company, whose central business is secure, trustable data management and processing. Preventing this type of cyberattack should be one of their most important goals. And yet, it happened. What can photographers and collection managers who use cloud services learn from this?

It’s impossible to know the real story from outside
The first thing to learn is that, as stated above, looking at a company from the outside can’t provide a guarantee. It’s hard to find a company that should have a better security practice than Equifax. They are not a startup prone to pivot, or running out of funds, or a company for whom security is a second tier issue. Yes, they make all kinds of mistakes in their reporting, but that’s an inherent part of gathering up trillions of individual transaction reports from many different sources.

If it’s hard for Equifax, it’s even harder for you
It’s getting reasonably common to hear that cloud service companies get breached, It happened to Adobe,  Yahoo (x3, at least!), and many more (click the link above for fun). But this does not mean you should just manage all your cloud security yourself. The vast majority of people (and institutional IT), simply have no idea how to fully protect from attack.

Cloud services have become essential in the creation, use, storage and management of photos and other media.  Unless you are going to go off-grid (start by throwing away your smartphone), you’re going to have to live with a certain amount of risk. The entry points for hacking are exploding. Now your fridge, car, connected camera, and smart lightbulbs can all be attacked by Internet of things (IoT) exploits. It’s going to get even harder to prevent cyberattacks as IoT grows.

So our best strategy is to become more resilient. Here are some tips.

1. Centralize all of the media you want to keep. Preserving your stuff starts with knowing where it is. If it’s spread between a phone, your laptop and across half a dozen hard drives, it’s impossible to really manage safely. You can now cheaply buy hard drives up to 12 TB. There is no excuse not to collect everything you want to keep.

2. Keep a local copy of any photos or other media you want to preserve. This means you need a copy of your photo archive on local drives, in your possession. Anything you have that is only stored in a cloud service is at some level of risk, and accurately determining that risk is beyond your ability.

3. Keep at least one copy of your data offline. For most people, that means copying your photos and other important data to additional hard drive(s) and unplugging. This is a backstop for all kinds of terrible things, not just cyberattack (lightning, theft, etc.)

4. Consider write-once media. While DVD and Blu-ray are fading from the media storage landscape, there is still a compelling reason to consider them. Photos stored on write-once media can’t be infected after-the-fact. If you think you have too much data for optical disc, consider the fact that Facebook has built a cold-data archive in North Carolina that employs Blu-ray (for the exact reasons outlined above).

5. If something is really sensitive and it needs to be stored in the cloud, you probably want it to be encrypted on the client side. (This means that software on your computer holds the encryption key, and the cloud service only has a scrambled copy of the data). Note that when I say really sensitive, I mean stuff that is life or death, or has a major financial component.

Backblaze is a service that provides client-side encryption. It’s not totally bulletproof, but someone would probably need to know exactly what to look for. Note that an encrypted cloud backup like Backblaze can also help to protect you against ransomware, like the May 2017 WannaCry attack, which is a growing problem.

6. Take a look at the cloud service providers you use. 
Even though you can’t remove all doubt about your cloud service providers, you can make some educated guesses. Does there appear to be a sustainable business model? Am I paying enough for this service to care about my security? Does a google search bring up anything hinky?

If you take these steps, you can help protect the integrity of your photo collection against growing hazards. You may not be able to prevent intrusion, but at least you can recover from it.

Progress on DAM Book 3

As promised, I’m providing a significant update on The DAM Book 3. The book is moving along quite well, although significant work remains. We are setting a very conservative release date of November 22nd. We may be able to move this up as the writing and layout moves along.  I also promised a look at the Table of Contents, and you can find it here.

I’ve spent the last two months working to integrate the new elements of the digital photography ecosystem into a cohesive discussion of how the parts interconnect. I’ve also done lot of work to disentangle stuff that looks similar, but has important differences.

For instance, how is a synced filesystem utility like Dropbox fundamentally different than a cloud library service like Libris, and what is each one good for?

I’ve also spent a good deal of time speaking to the many experts I know in the field of imaging, testing my assumptions, and checking to see if I’m missing any big elements in the ecosystem.

With the scope and structure locked down, and all the old copy redlined and commented, I’m entering the home stretch. Now it’s time to finish the execution. Some chapters are basically done, and some are still in outline form. I expect that we’ll see some small changes in the Table of Contents, but those changes should be minor.

We’re still running our Dam Book 2 special. Buy The DAM Book 2 for $19.95 and get $15 off The DAM Book 3. At some point in the next month or so, we will start discounted pre-sales for The DAM Book 3. Sign up for our mailing list (on the top right of this page) to stay up to date on our special offers and release dates.

Rail System for copying film – DYP Movie of the Week

This video from Digitizing Your Photos  outlines two related types of film copying equipment – rail systems and bellows systems. I’ve been using these systems for more than a decade to digitize large amounts of my own film. They are fast to use and relatively easy to set up for a photographer experienced with lighting.

At the moment, these systems are do-it-yourself, but we’re working on finding someone to produce them commercially. In the meantime, we’re about to start renting ones I personally own. Click here to find out more.

Capturing context – DYP Movie of the week

When digitizing your photos, it’s important to capture any “nearby” information. Dates and notes on slide mounts, writing on the back of prints, notes on boxes and envelopes and other information can help you understand the content  and ownership of the images. It can be time-consuming to stop and transfer these notes to your scans.

In Digitizing Your Photos, I show how I approach the capture of nearby information. The fastest, simplest and most complete way to record these notes is to shoot photos of it, and include those photos in the catalog. In the case of prints, it’s simple to flip the print upside down and shoot the backside. Boxes and folders can also be photographed as you shoot the contents of these containers.

When coping slides, I suggest that you shoot the slides as a group after copying individual slides. Use front light to show any writing, and make sure the light rakes in from one side so that blind embossed writing shows up. This video from Chapter 2 shows the hardware setup I recommend to shoot the slide mounts.

Film Copy Setup – DYP Movie of the Week

The easiest way to build a copy setup for film (slides, transparencies and negatives) is to lay a lightbox on the copy stand and then put a negative carrier on top of that. This video from Digitizing Your Photos shows you how set one of these up (including how to make sure that the camera and the film are parallel to each other.)

I cover several other setups for copying film in the book, but this one requires no special tools and can be made wth stuff that is commonly available at camera shops.

Remove Silvering – DYP Movie of the Week

This post kicks off a series of tips and techniques from Digitizing Your Photos. These posts will focus on  a particular technique from the multimedia eBook, and include one of the videos from the book.

It’s common for vintage prints to exhibit Silver Mirroring (or Silvering). The reflections caused by residual silver can obscure the shadow detail in the print. Fortunately, it’s easy to remove the mirroring in the copy photo through the use of simple cross-polarization. This video shows how to cross-polarize and what the effect looks like.

This video appears on page 48 of Digitizing Your Photos with Your Camera and Lightroom.

Digitizing Your Photos – Just Released

We’re excited about the release of our new multimedia ebook, Digitizing Your Photos. It presents a comprehensive method for scanning photos with a digital camera, and managing the process with Lightroom.

The book is written for professional photographers, family historians, corporate collection managers, and cultural heritage institutions. We know that great collections of slides, prints and negatives are everywhere, and we want to help preserve and make use of them.

The book runs for 248 pages, and includes 90 workflow videos for a total of 9 hours of comprehensive instruction.


Here’s the first video from the book, which outlines the entire process.

And here’s the product page.

Report from SXSW #1

Once again it was a great festival: fun, exhausting, and thought-provoking.

Our talk, Adding Meaning and Context to Visual Media was a packed house, turning people away at the door.  As with previous years, one of the main values to me was the time spent refining the presentation, and distilling the ideas to a logical sequence in digestible form. I’ll do a blog post hitting the main points, and I’m hoping to give the talk again with my fellow panelists, Anna Dickson and Ramesh Jain.
Sell-out crowd, with line out the door at our SXSW talk this year.

This year, I spent a lot of time learning about Artificial Intelligence, and came away with a lot more clarity about what AI is, how it is being developed, and how to take advantage of it. I also saw some of the ways AI-based assistants are shaking up the world of computing. I believe that Google home, Amazon Echo, Siri,  and Facebook Messenger are actually racing to become the new dominant operating system. Natural Language Processing and Conversational UI will be the way we interact with computers in the future. The way this shakes out will be really important. I’ll have a post on that as well.

Photography (in all its many forms) continued to be a major component of what I saw at SXSW. This ranged from “traditional” photography, like Cory Richard’s keynote, to photography as advocacy in Aaron Huey’s work, to Casey Niestat’s new network, and on to the VR exhibits.
Ron Haviv and Lauren Walsh spoke about the democratization of archives and the Lost Rolls project.

There was more political activism, analysis and anxiety than in years past. This included a pretty frightening discourse on big data and fascism (from historical and speculative viewpoints). There was also a heavy emphasis on using creativity and technology for public good. Carina Kolodny and Marc Janks spoke about driving change through multimedia storytelling at Huffington Post. Rainn Wilson (Dwight!) spoke about building Soul Pancake, a media company based on empathy.


I was inspired talking to Aaron Huey about his advocacy efforts. 

The National Geographic made a pretty big splash at the festival, with a 5 day installation in Vulcan Gas Company restaurant on 6th St.  They brought in a great set of speaker presentations, and the event was attended by both Declan Moore, the CEO of National Geographic Partners (the media company) and Gary Knell, CEO of the National Geographic Society (the non-profit side of the organization). I believe that this was the first SXSW for both of them, and they seemed to be really energized by the festival. Gary also led a presentation about National Geographic’s Emerging Explorers program.


Gary Knell and Declan Moore address the crowd at NatGeo Further Base Camp. 

PhotoShelter sent down an exploratory contingent, including CEO Andrew Fingerman, founder Grover Sanchagrin, and Content Marketing Manager Deborah Block. I hope to see an even greater presence next year, now that they have been able to see the opportunities it presents.

Andrew Fingerman talks with Amy Bailett of Killer Infographics about the changing nature of visual communication.

Of course, there was also great music, and again this year I got a small taste of it on my way out the door. One year, I’d love to stick around for the last 5 days of the festival and take advantage of that platinum badge. But, honestly, I’m just so exhausted from the Interactive festival that it’s hard to imagine spending even more time fighting crowds.


Some jazz band I stumbled across at 2am, that was just amazing…

I’ll make some further posts that outline some of my findings, starting with one about AI.

As I tell all my photo and tech people, I continue to think that SXSW is one of the most important events that anyone in media can attend.  Media is inherently driven by the technology that enables it. Even more important, I believe it’s really beneficial to understand how technology, content, and business models intersect. I think SXSW is one of the best places on earth to see what’s coming down the road.