Category Archives: Publishing

The DAM Book 3.0

Krogh_140218_5460We’re thrilled to announce that work has begun on The DAM Book 3.0.

It’s been nearly five years since The DAM Book Second Edition was released, and I’m really pleased how well it’s held up in that time – the principles and thought processes remain relevant. However, five years is a couple of lifetimes in the tech world.

Cloud services, social media and mobile photography have had a tremendous impact on the way we make, publish, store and organize our photos. And video has also become an important tool for many still photographers.

I’ve continued digging in to the material deeply, particularly over the last year. If you read my blog, you’ll have seen some of my thoughts on where the world of digital photo management is heading.

In The DAM Book 3.0, I’ll be writing about how you can understand and integrate the new tools with your workflow. And the book will help still photographers understand how to get control of the video shooting and management process.

I’ll also be adding a chapter about project management. When your creative needs reach beyond the capabilities of your catalog software, you need to take a different approach to the entire process. I’ll outline how to manage and archive projects when a conventional catalog is not the proper tool.

We’re targeting a July 1, 2014 delivery for The DAM Book 3.0, but we’ll release it as soon as it’s ready.

DAM Book Guides
Another big change is one I’ve already announced. I’m pulling all the software-specific workflow out of the book. That’s the one part of the book that is outdated, and it’s also the part that is best accomplished with multimedia publications. So while the “evergreen” content will remain in The DAM Book, workflow will now be found in The DAM Book Guides.

Splitting the content in this way accomplishes several things. I can target it to a specific task or software package, or even a type of reader. For instance, Organizing Your Photos is written for all Lightroom users, while Multi-Catalog Workflow is written for a much smaller percentage of power users. And I can update these books more regularly.

Upgrade Policy
We know we’re making this announcement much earlier than most publishers would. We consider our relationship to the reader to be a partnership, so we want to keep you informed. And we know that teachers in schools and universities need to do advance planning. So we have a few offers we wanted to let you know about.

If you buy The DAM Book 2 (2009 Edition) after today (March 5th, 2014), you’ll get a $15 coupon toward the purchase of The DAM Book 3.0.

If you have bought The DAM Book 2 (or any of our other books) from us at an earlier date, you’ll get an opportunity to buy the new version at a 20% discount through the first 30 days of release. Yes, that means you get The DAM Book 2e nearly free.

If you bought The DAM Book 2 from someone other than us, Tweet, Facebook, Google+ or email us a photo of yourself with your book, and we’ll put you on the 20%-off coupon list. (Make sure to notify us directly in any case.)

OYP Review by Matt Dawson

I’ve not met Matt Dawson in person, but I know him through the Lightroom beta program. He writes and publishes plugins for Lightroom.

140206_TPG_OYP_Review

He’s just written a nice review of Organizing Your Photos describing the value of the book and the whole multimedia approach. More importantly, he outlines how the book provides clarity in the complex task of organization.

And he agrees that this book will be useful to all Lightroom users, from the novice up through the power user. As I was writing this book, these were my highest goals – to be able to provide useful clarity for Lightroom users all along the spectrum.

I think Matt has also done a good job communicating the content of the book and highlighting the particular sections that were most valuable to him.

So, thanks Matt.

Our ship is coming in…

…but for now, the paperback copy of Organizing Your Photos with Lightroom 5 is backordered. (Paperbackordered?)
MOI_COSMOS2
Our transport ship, the Mol Cosmos has cleared the straight of Gibraltar and is headed to New York right now.

We’ve been thrilled at the response we’ve gotten from the release of our new eBook. Electronic sales have been excellent, and so have sales of the Printed Book/DVD combo. So good, in fact, that we’ve run out of the first shipment, and have to put the paper copy on backorder until early March.

We’ve knocked $5 off the price of the paperback book + DVD on our site during the time of the backorder. In the meantime, you can still buy the electronic version, or get delivery on DVD at the regular price. Note that you can use discount codes with this offer, like the VIP code you get for buying anything directly from us.

The ship carrying the books, The Mol Cosmos, is due to arrive in New York from Singapore on the 26th of February. It will take a few days for the books to clear customs and get to us. And of course, in the internet age, it’s possible to follow along at home. Here’s a link to a (kind of) real-time tracking site for the ship.

Bon Voyage.

Lightroom Missing FAQ Now on DAM Useful!

lr5-book1Those of you who have read my books know that I’m a huge fan of Victoria Bampton’s book, Adobe Lightroom 5 – The Missing FAQ. She has created the most comprehensive reference manual detailing the function of each menu item, button, pulldown and right-click in Lightroom. I keep it handy whenever I’m trying to learn some a new trick, teach a class or write a book. I know that even people on the Lightroom team at Adobe sometimes use the book as a reference.

In my recent DAM Book Guides, I have written comprehensive but targeted books which are focused on solving a particular problem. I’ll show you how to use the important tools in the way I suggest you use them, rather than telling you every option possible. That’s because the place you should go to learn about all options is the place I go: The Missing FAQ.

Victoria’s company, The Lightroom Queen, is an independent publisher, as is DAM Useful Publishing. And I’m really happy to announce that we have started a joint marketing venture. We’ve begun by placing our books in each other’s stores. So you can now buy The Missing FAQ here at theDAMBook.com. And we’re also offering her free Quick Start Guide

Until February 25th, we have a discounted bundle featuring Organizing Your Photos with Lightroom 5 along with The Missing FAQ.

It’s an exciting new world of independent publishing, and we’re really happy to be working with someone we admire.

 

NGS Seminar

35 years ago, as a high school senior, I was invited to the National Geographic photographers’ yearly seminar (thanks to Clark Mishler, who was working in the Photographic Department at the time, saw my photos in a contest, and took the trouble to call my school and invite me to attend).

Every year that I go, I find it to be one of the most interesting, inspiring and intellectually invigorating experiences I can imagine. In the last 15 years or so, I have also been going to the Image Sales (now National Geographic Creative) business meeting, since they represent some of my stock photography. That meeting has also become one of the most interesting days of the year.

The business meeting recaps the past year for NG Creative and rolls out the plans for the year ahead. Over the years, I’ve seen NG Creative come into form, starting as an old-school stock photo agency, and turning into a nimble, smart and forward-thinking agency offering photos, videos, fine art, assignments and stock. It’s been a great education to watch Maura Mulvihill and Bill Perry build this department. (There’s a nice article in the January 2014 PDN magazine about NGC.)

The seminar day is always a real photographic feast. This year, the headliner was Danny Lyon, a Magnum photographer who has used his camera as a tool for advocacy. He’s a classic insurgent – irreverent, passionate, fighting for what’s right, and not afraid to tell it to the man exactly as he sees it.

In addition to Danny, we saw great presentations by Hasan Elahi, Wayne Lawrence, Newsha Tavakorian, Tyler Hicks, Vince Musi and David Maisel. While it’s always a bit overwhelming and humbling, this event also provides wonderful inspiration for the new year.

CC Licenses, APIs and Content Stacks

I just read an article in Wired that pushed a lot of my buttons, and illustrates a number of the points in my talk at the PACA conference two weeks ago.

A company called Pro Populi has used some AOL data to create a new service that makes the data available in new ways, notably on a mobile platform. The data is published by AOL under a Creative Commons license which allows for reuse in an nearly unlimited number of ways, as long as credit is given.

At first I thought this was a story about people unwittingly giving away the store. As I have been writing recently, I think that many people are granting very broad licenses to use their content when they post on social media. This can come back to bite you when someone starts to build a new service with your data in ways you aren’t expecting.

This is a particular problem for media companies that publish stuff to other social media platforms. If you are a media company pushing your content online to Instagram or Facebook, you may find that the content shows up in competing products that you exercise no control over (and get no revenue from). The story in Wired uses this as the lead – AOL publishes database, and company scrapes up the whole thing, reformats it, and builds a new service with the data.

But buried in the 12th paragraph is the real story – the business implications of the Application Programming Interface or API. APIs allow one company to make their data available to another user, service, device or application. And they come with their own terms of service, with implications that few people understand.

On the surface, an API seems like a great way to short-cycle development. You can wire up the content or service into your own in a matter of minutes, hours or days, instead of months or years of development. It’s creating phenomenal growth as data stacks and business models are remixed on the fly.

But APIs typically come with take-it-or-leave-it usage terms. When you build with APIs, you run great risk that the service which is offering the API-fed data will simply turn off the spigot. If your business depends on the live link to the data that APIs provide, you are at the mercy of the provider. And that’s the story here, the one that Wired buried.

Welcome to APIworld. Over the next few years, APIs are going to become central to the battle for commerce and business development, particularly in the media realm. We’re going to be seeing this story a lot in the next few years, as more people find that they have built their businesses on agreements they did not even know they were making.