Category Archives: Digitizing Your Photos

Rail Systems for Rent or Sale

UPDATE: We have a limited number of these units for sale.   Contact us at support@theDAMbook.com

  • Comes with 220mm rail, slide/negative stage, arca-compatible camera mount
  • Base Price $300
  • Longer rail – add $50
  • File out back side of film stage to improve border rendering – add $25

Some additional information:

  • All units are made from Nikon PS-4 and PS-5 slide/negative copy adapters. They accept standard 35mm mounted slides and unmounted 35mm film. The Nikon units are used and may show signs of wear, including blemishes on the metal and imperfections in the bellows leather.
  • The standard model I have for sale has a 220mm rail, which is suitable for use of a 60mm lens (or shorter). Longer rails available for an additional cost.
  • Some models have diffusers and some do not. I suggest removing the diffuser because they can attract dust. Using a light source that is far outside the depth of field  can ensure a dust free light source.
  • I can also file out  the back side of the negative carrier for an additional $25. This allows for a slightly better black border rendering of full frame negatives.

A lot of readers are asking how to get a rail system for 35mm slide and negative copying. I’m working on some sourcing options for this. In the meantime, we’re going to offer the units that I personally own as rental items.

What we can provide

The rental is for a rail, a film stage, a generic camera plate if needed, and step down ring to allow your lens to connect to the shade if needed (These units have a 52mm lens connection.)

These units have had the rounded corners filed down to show the full frame of the image. You’ll get a natural black border on standard 35mm film.

Here’s an example of a negative scanned with a rail system and turned positive with the techniques outlined in my new book. The black border is created in-camera and shows the entire frame of the image. Note that each different unit will produce a slightly different black border. 

Rail System Options

We have several styles of unit, all made from Nikon slide copy adapters. Some have the rear diffusion glass, and in some the glass has been removed.
• Without diffusion – this requires that you have a nice even light source such as a softbox or lightbox. Shooting without diffusion means there is no chance of dust particles sticking to the glass and appearing in every shot.
• With diffusion – This will make it easier for some people to make a smooth and even illumination across the frame. Note that the diffuser dust can be a real problem.

Nikon PB-6 and PS-6

I also have a Nikon Bellows unit for rent. To use this, you need a full frame small body Nikon camera (e.g. D750, D800, D810, D600, D610, D700) and a 55mm or a 60mm Nikon Macro lens.

D1, D2, D3, D4, And D5 cameras do not fit on these units.

What you need

You’ll need your own camera and macro lens, as well as a light source (strobe or LED recommended). YOUR CAMERA DOES NOT HAVE TO BE A NIKON.

Camera – Rail systems can be used with any brand or model of camera.

Lens – In order to connect the lens shade, you’ll need to use a “normal” length macro lens. This means a 50mm-60mm range for full frame DSLR and 35mm range for APS-C or micro 4/3 camera.

Digitizing Your Photos – It is strongly recommended to have a copy of my most recent book in order to get the most out of your rental. Shown below is a video from the book.

Terms

Rental is $50/week, or $150/month. You pay shipping both ways (we prefer if you can provide a Fedex or UPS account number.) When we send the unit out, we need to take a credit card deposit for $300.

If you are interested in rental, drop us a line at support@theDAMbook.com or make a Facebook comment below. Let us know whether you want a Rail or bellows system, whether you want the diffuser or not, and how soon you’re looking to get started.

 

 

 

 

Capturing context – DYP Movie of the week

When digitizing your photos, it’s important to capture any “nearby” information. Dates and notes on slide mounts, writing on the back of prints, notes on boxes and envelopes and other information can help you understand the content  and ownership of the images. It can be time-consuming to stop and transfer these notes to your scans.

In Digitizing Your Photos, I show how I approach the capture of nearby information. The fastest, simplest and most complete way to record these notes is to shoot photos of it, and include those photos in the catalog. In the case of prints, it’s simple to flip the print upside down and shoot the backside. Boxes and folders can also be photographed as you shoot the contents of these containers.

When coping slides, I suggest that you shoot the slides as a group after copying individual slides. Use front light to show any writing, and make sure the light rakes in from one side so that blind embossed writing shows up. This video from Chapter 2 shows the hardware setup I recommend to shoot the slide mounts.

Film Copy Setup – DYP Movie of the Week

The easiest way to build a copy setup for film (slides, transparencies and negatives) is to lay a lightbox on the copy stand and then put a negative carrier on top of that. This video from Digitizing Your Photos shows you how set one of these up (including how to make sure that the camera and the film are parallel to each other.)

I cover several other setups for copying film in the book, but this one requires no special tools and can be made wth stuff that is commonly available at camera shops.

Remove Silvering – DYP Movie of the Week

This post kicks off a series of tips and techniques from Digitizing Your Photos. These posts will focus on  a particular technique from the multimedia eBook, and include one of the videos from the book.

It’s common for vintage prints to exhibit Silver Mirroring (or Silvering). The reflections caused by residual silver can obscure the shadow detail in the print. Fortunately, it’s easy to remove the mirroring in the copy photo through the use of simple cross-polarization. This video shows how to cross-polarize and what the effect looks like.

This video appears on page 48 of Digitizing Your Photos with Your Camera and Lightroom.