Category Archives: Equipment

Testing Nikon D850 for Camera Scans

Nikon sent me a D850 to do some camera scan testing. My initial impression is that it it really promising, but I have not been able to get it to do exactly what I want. It does a pretty good job for most negatives, but it’s having problems on dark images.

I’ll run a number of rolls through it over the weekend and report back.  I will say that even if it’s not perfect now, I can tell this is going to be a great solution for camera scanning color negatives, particularly in conjunction with Lightroom.

Nikon D850 – Built as a scanner?

The Nikon D850 has been announced, and it looks like a heck of a nice camera. The headline stuff includes everything we’ve come to expect from the next magical generation of digital SLR cameras – 45 megapixels, 7 frames per second, ISO 25,600, 8k video, touch screen, and so much more.

But tucked away on page 85 of the PDF brochure is this: a negative digitizer! Apparently the camera has a built-in algorithm for flipping negatives positive.

Some seasoned photographers may be exploring ways to convert their film assets created with old cameras into digital data. Taking advantage of its high-pixel count of 45 megapixels, the D850 offers an option for digitizing film (35mm-format), which can handle color and monochrome negatives. First, set an optional ES-2 Film Digitizing Adapter onto a lens such as the AF-S Micro NIKKOR 60mm f/2.8G ED attached to the D850. Then, insert the film to be digitized in an FH-4 Strip Film Holder or FH-5 Slide Mount Holder, and shoot. The camera’s digitizing function automatically reverses the colors and stores them as JPEG images. This once time-consuming process involving a film scanner can be done much more quickly. You can enjoy pictures with family and friends while selecting and digitizing by displaying them on a large TV monitor connected via an HDMI cable. Enjoy your old film images by digitizing them with the D850.

There are several items above that I’d love to test. If it could handle color negatives reasonably well, this could be a major workflow improvement for camera scanning.

And I don’t really like the ES-2, but there’s no reason not to use a rail system or copystand /lightbox .

In any case, it’s very exciting to see Nikon acknowledge this missing market niche, especially when so many photographers have mourned the loss of the Nikon scanner line.

New high-CRI lights for film scanning

LED lighting is a fast-moving product landscape, with prices plummeting and quality increasing faster than anything I’ve ever seen in photography.I was over at B&H last week getting things all set up for my September 13 presentation at the Event Space. I took the opportunity to look at the LED lights on display. I found a nice little unit from Dracast that should be great for camera scanning transparencies on a rail system. At $68, it looked well made. Even better, it listed a CRI number of 95, which is a very high quality light for the price.

I was talking to Gary on the sales floor, and I wondered if this light was really 95 CRI. He smiled and said he’d be back in a minute. When he returned, he had a $2200 Sekonic C‑7000 SpectroMaster Color in hand. “Let’s find out” he said. We took readings of the light, and, sure enough, it showed a CRI over 97.

I’m going to buy one of these lights and take it for a spin. Note that because this light is designed to be used on-camera, it does not come with an AC adapter. I checked with the company and they tell me it takes a 12 volt 10 watt power supply. I have a bunch of old 12 volt power supplies lying around, so I’ll test with these when the light arrives.

Note, there are several variations of the Camlux light from Dracast. For camera scanning, I’m not interested in the bicolor, but they would be useful for shooting. These come in daylight or bicolor. Here they are linked.

160 LED Bicolor $69
160 LED Daylight  $68
160 LED Bi-color with battery and charger $89