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Preview Problem, EM2 with Capture 5
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Author Topic: Preview Problem, EM2 with Capture 5  (Read 2813 times)
Zero
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« on: June 23, 2010, 11:50:55 AM »

I am the first time in this forum and new in the DAM world. But now thousands of pictures are located on my computer harddisk, sorted by the year and a description (holiday in…, zoo, flowers, family…) as second criteria. It is not really simple to find all or some pictures with e.g. flowers or birds. Therefore I start working with Expression Media 2 one month ago. Together with Capture NX (CNX) it works not bad. The changes I made in the NEF data (not converted to JPG, TIF because I like to work with the RAW format as long as possible) I see in the previews of EM2.
I have tested now Capture One 5.1.2 RAW converter (CO5) and I like it a bit more than CNX. But I can’t find a way to see the results of the modified RAW files. It seems to be always the basic version with the camera settings. I think the reason will be the different way how the RAW converters operate. CNX include the changes into the file and CO5 writes the modifications to files beside the originals.
Has anyone experience with EM2, together with CO5 and an idea how this problem can be solved?

P.S.: I am a German native speaker and I hope that my English is good enough that you can understand what I want to say.

Thank you in advance for your help

Hans
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R. Neil Haugen
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« Reply #1 on: June 26, 2010, 12:51:19 PM »

Welcome, I'm not a "major" contributor around here but think I can answer your question.

CaptureNX, as a Nikon in-house product, "knows" the internal coding in NEF files and is designed to re-make the previews and thumbnails contained in those NEF files as you change them in NX. Non-Nikon software doesn't have the "authority" to do so, as the creators of their code don't have full access to the NIKON internal code-lines, and so don't mess with the NEF files. So ... you see the mods you've made to the file within NX when viewing those NEF's in any other software, but using LR, Capture1, Bibble, or any other converter to "process" the files will NOT give you a new thumbnail or preview within that NEFthat can be "seen" by any other program.

This is one of the reasons Peter recommends (in The DAM Book II) that after procession in say, LR, one uses LR to convert the files to DNG with the option to embed a new thumb/preview so that any DAM app looking at and showing you your previously-processed files shows the processed file, NOT the original-from-camera thumb/preveiw.

Is this helpful? Ich spreche ein wenig Deutsch, aber nur ein wenig ...

Neil
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R Neil Haugen
MyPhotoMentor.com
rNeilPhotog.com
Haugensgalleri.com
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« Reply #2 on: June 28, 2010, 12:46:06 PM »

Hallo Neil,

Thank you for your information. I will check whether I will prefer the DNG workflow or it will be better still using CNX instead of CO5. We will see.
I have bought Peters book and will start working through the book now. I hope that I can get some information which will help me to find a good DAM workflow.

Hans 
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R. Neil Haugen
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« Reply #3 on: June 29, 2010, 12:35:37 AM »

Hans,

One thing I finally GOT from his books ... I started with the first edition over a year ago ... but just finally "got" a couple days ago. And that's a clear picture of his workflow suggestion. I'd read through the books and the charts and diagrams, but still, how and when the buckets came about was eluding me, as something with any "flow" to it.

It's a progression, is all it is. And for different types of work, he has a couple completely separate folder/subfolder progressions. Perhaps the main folder structure he keeps as his "Working Directory" has several subfolders in it, for different stages of the main processing steps he does. Yours would probably be different. Comparing it back to the film-shooting days, it's kinda like having a series of boxes for work-in-progress, one for film to go to develop and proof, one for film/proofs back but not numbered, one for ready to show client, one for ready to fill out print order for lab, one for back from lab for finishing, one for prints ready for client, and finally one for envelopes ready to be filed in the negative cabinets. Anyone could look at the boxes and see exactly what work was waiting to be done at each step of the way.

It's really at heart a very simple concept! He just uses folders and sub-folders to "move" his images through the same sort of process as I list above, instead of the literal boxes we used to use. Anyone looking into any of the main sub-folders for each step of the processing will see what jobs, shoots, or projects are sitting there waiting for the work to move them along the process. When he completes each step of the process with the images of any shoot, he moves the folder of that shoot to the next sub-folder step to await the next bit of work on it. To modify it for yourself, just figure out what YOUR main processing steps are before you are ready to permanently "park" your images.

The "standard" workflow subfolders of his Working Directory are:
1_Landing_Zone      This is the sub-folder where he creates a folder for each job and "ingests" or uploads pictures. The folder for each shoot is typically created automatically by the settings he uses in ImageIngesterPro, the up-loading program he uses.

2_Rate_and_Adjust     This is pretty self-explanatory, right? He'll do a quick numerical "star" rating of the images, maybe some block keyword/metadata items too, and then adjust or "develop" them in blocks or perhaps even individually on the best rated images. This is not normally to "perfection", but to think of as making a good "proof" image.

3_Convert_to_DNG        The images have been adjusted to a point that they look pretty good, and probably pretty close to where they'd be if he "polished" them further. He has most likely been processing in Lightroom so far, or perhaps the Bridge/ACR raw converter for small jobs, and there are settings that have been changed so that the image looks very different perhaps from the thumbnail and preview image the camera created and embedded in the file. By making a DNG file from the camera raw at this point, or by telling the program to update the DNG thumb/preview if a file or group has already been converted, he can now have a thumbnail and preview image embedded in the file with all major image adjustments shown ... cropping, color, contrast, all of those things.

4_DNG_Landing_Zone        The folder he tells the DNG creator (either in Lightroom or the stand-alone DNG converter) to put the folder of images in as it converts them.

5_Transfer_Me     After checking that the DNG conversion has gone well, he moves the folder of images to this folder to await transferring to his long-term using/storage system, or "archive". This is where the "bucket" system begins. In this "Transfer Me" folder he creates a sub-folders named sequentially,  sized for his optical-backup of choice. He has switched to Blu-Ray discs, holding about 23 gigs each, so he fills a sub-folder of this Transfer folder with shoot folders until he gets to that 23-gig limit, then burns them to Blu-Ray disc. If one doesn't shoot THAT much within say a month or a bit less, one may choose (like we do at our studios) to use DVD's which hold about 4.3 gigs.

When he's got a full sub-folder or two (the "buckets" he talks of) that have been "burned" to optical disk, he copies the entire "bucket" to his main image Archive in a sequential fashion ... leaving all the subfolders of actual images within the sequentially numbered "bucket" folder as an "additive" transfer to the main Archive drives. He does this with a program that validates all the data such that he knows that ALL the data got to it's new location in perfect order. After the transfer is validated and a fresh back-up has been run of his Archives, he moves the "bucket" he's still got in that "Transfer Me" folder to:

6_Transferred      And at some point, when they're doing drive maintenance of have a few minutes, they'll delete these as they are redundant and unnecessary.

After this, any further work he does is controlled through his catalog or DAM program (He uses ExpressionMedia, some use say idImager or just Lightroom) for when he needs to find an image to use it for something, say a client order or emails to friends or whatnot. There's some other steps along the way, especially the back-up routines, but the above is a good encapsulation of his process. It's clean, easy to follow for anyone sitting down to work with or on images, and very, VERY safe and gentle upon those files!

Neil
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R Neil Haugen
MyPhotoMentor.com
rNeilPhotog.com
Haugensgalleri.com
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