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Author Topic: Preparing new hard drives  (Read 8530 times)
barbaramiller
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« Reply #15 on: January 30, 2010, 09:25:59 PM »

Hi Peter:

Been reading your notes under the 35 pass erase.  I guess when I zeroed out my drive, I may have only zeroed out the volume.  The lower one in Disk Utility.  I was confused, as the drive is supposed to be a Seagate Momentus,
so I would expect it to show up as "465.8 ST9500420ASG" but it showed up as "465.8 GB Oxford" which seems to me is the chipset and not the drive.

Should I zero out again, selecting the "465.8 Oxford" and MacOS Extended (Journaled)?

Barbara
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barbaramiller
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« Reply #16 on: January 31, 2010, 03:12:36 AM »

OK, I looked at the dpBestflow video, so I followed it and re-zeroed out my Momentus drive.  This time before erasing, I chose 1 partition and GUID partition table.
Then I zeroed out again; but this time I selected the Drive (instead of the Volume) and did it Mac OS Extended (journaled).   On the bottom of the Erase window in Disc Utility during the 2-1/2 hour time that I was zero-ing out, for Partition Scheme, it said GUID Partition Table; however during the last 30 seconds of this erase, it changed back to Apple Partition Map. 

This concerns me as I want to first create a bootable backup on this drive, and then I want to replace my current laptop drive with this one.  So I thought it should be GUID partition.
Is this just a Disk Utility quirk where it reverts back to default?  But I thought I saw it say formatting drive just before it changed back to saying "Apple Partition Map".

(Also noted, but perhaps of no import:  this time after zeroing out, the volume shows .04 GB less of free space than after the first time I zeroed out.  Also it estimated that it would take 2 hours to zero out; but in fact took 2 hrs. and 31 minutes.)  My real concern is the reversion to Apple Partition Map.

Thanks for any input.

Barbara

MBPro 3,1
Intel Core 2 Duo
2.4 GHz, 7200 rpm
4GB memory, 160GB (148.73) HD

Zeroing out Seagate Momentus laptop drive
500GB, 7200rpm
 
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peterkrogh
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« Reply #17 on: February 01, 2010, 09:34:52 PM »

Barbara,
Hmm, something fishy there.
Fishy hard drives make me nervous.
Yes, it sounds like you want GUID. I'd try to reformat.  Probably not necessary to erase again - just partition.
Longer times to zero may indicate a problem, but not what you describe (if it estimated 2 and took 6, I'd be very tempted to want to look at the SMART data.  The extra half hour doe not concern me.
The available space does not either. 
Peter
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barbaramiller
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« Reply #18 on: February 04, 2010, 03:55:08 AM »

Thanks, Peter:

I did reformat, and made a clone and booted from it (with SyncProX - which seemed to do fine with Parallels, Windows, Blackberry, GoldMine).
 
I had a slight glitch at one point where I got an error message "error occurred while setting the UID andGID of a newly-created folder.  Path:  new 500GB Seagate Momentus:.HFS+ Private Directory Data"  so I reconfirmed partitioning Guid Partition Table, disconnected
Cinema screen FW enabler/connector so only FW connection was the new HD, restarted all drives, and the issue resolved and clone went smoothly. (I never messed with the setting of UID and GID, so was thankful when it resolved).

I am about to format and zero out all my new storage and back-up drives.  I was planning to also use GUID Partition Table even though I am not planning to use them as start up drives.  I am using an Intel MacBookPro 3,1 and hope in the not too distant future to have an 8 core MacPro (might as well dream high).  I still have an old laptop for emergency - G4 Titanium; though maybe now my bootable clones are my emergency (except in the case of other hardware failure).

To get to the point: 
If I use GUID, does that mean I could not access data on the external HD with my old laptop?  This could be a moot point anyway, as I'm realizing I can't access the Sata drives anyway w/G4 since my Express 34 card wouldn't work.  So I'm going to use the GUID
partition table and sleep while it zeros out.  Marching forward, not backwards. 

But the question remains:  If you are not using the external hard drive as a bootable clone but for data storage, is it still preferable to use the GUID partition table over the Apple Partition Map when working on Intel Macs?

Thanks,
Barbara

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tho3hite
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« Reply #19 on: March 12, 2010, 02:39:47 PM »

I read the DAM book and looked at the dpbestworkflow.org site. The suggestion about zeroing drives is a great one. I'm not sure how much it helps but it doesn't cost but a little time to try.

I'm curious where the marking of bad blocks gets performed. Bye the drives internal controller or the OS level disk drivers? In the video on the website it shows the drives being partitioned first and the zeroed. Would it work just as well to zero the drive and then partition?

I'm wondering if each time I repartition a drive if I should repeat the zero procedure.

During the last 3-years my digital photo archive has been hit by a series of misfortunes:
- bugs in Reatropect backup software
- bugs in Aperture (using Lightroom now)
- bugs in SoftRAID (not using at present)
- Seagate 7200.11 firmware bugs
- ExpressCard eSATA drives incompatible with Snow Leopard

Fortunately I'm not aware of having lost more that time to any of these problems but it has made me pretty cautious (or paranoid).


Thomas

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peterkrogh
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« Reply #20 on: March 13, 2010, 09:42:28 AM »

Thomas,
The bad blocks are recorded in the drive's firmware. Touching each block asks the drive to check it for readability. I would say it's not necessary when you repartition, but it would be a reasonable thing to do, since it adds little to the overhead of the process, and it is a good indicator of the health f the drive.  Better still if you can check SMART data before and after to make sure you are not seeing a climbing bad sector count.
Peter
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