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getting rid of XMP data that is messing with my ratings & color coding
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Author Topic: getting rid of XMP data that is messing with my ratings & color coding  (Read 4125 times)
Sossity Corby
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« on: May 25, 2008, 04:45:05 PM »

Quote from: Dierk on April 28, 2008, 05:59:55 AM
Definitely leave out the Urgency setting in Downloader Pro; I've seen the same as you when I [inadvertently] applied it once - hard to get rid of later on.

Another useful tip: After having imported your files into xMedia [and save the catalogue afterwards] immediately get rid of the XMP files Downloader Pro has written. If you leave them beside your files weird things can happen when syncing back to file.


How do I go about doing this? I must be missing something, where in Expression media do I do this? where are/what are /is XMP data does this mean I should not add my meta data; ie keywords etc in Downloader Pro & just do/add all my bulk meta data in Expression media? or does it mean I should remove all meta data I added in Downloader Pro? if so does this not defeat the purpose of Downloader pro? I like to get as much of my DAM work done to my original images as soon as possible; upon downloading, as opposed to after the fact, to save time. For me I prefer to get as much done in the beginning as it is harder for me to go back over stuff, as my images build up I am less likely to go back over stuff.

Sossity
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Dierk
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149167100 Dierk54@Hotmail.com Evo2Me dhslowhand
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« Reply #1 on: May 26, 2008, 12:58:46 AM »

You have to delete XMP files outside xMedia, that is in Windows Explorer.



Background:

XMP files are so called sidecar files, secondary files containing data for another file.
Programs being XMP-aware, see the XMPs but [usually] do not show them; they take the info in them and apply them to the proper primary file.

Full support of XMP would mean that programs not only read from XMP, they write into them and carry it with the primary file for any other operation. You change the name of the primary file, in our case photos, and the XMP's name gets changed, too. You move the primary file from one location to another, the XMP goes with it. In the best of all worlds this would be implemented on OS level, so that all applications have to link into the API and done with it. Whatever program you then use for file manipulation, any other program would reflect the changes.

Alas, currently only very few programs do support XMP fully - and xMedia is not one of them, neither is Windows. Furthermore, xMedia cannot show XMPs, it is not among the importers. But you don't need them inside xMedia. It is faster and safer to use the Windows Explorer [or, I guess, Mac's Finder, though file format support is one of the major differences between the platforms] and delete the XMPs there.

Unless you need them for Lightroom ...
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Dierk

IDimager on Windows XP/SP2; 3.2 GHz, 2 GB RAM, loads of storage space.
Other: Nikon D2x, Nikon D200, Capture NX 2, Adobe Creative Suite 3
Sossity Corby
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« Reply #2 on: May 26, 2008, 02:24:42 PM »

You have to delete XMP files outside xMedia, that is in Windows Explorer.



Background:

XMP files are so called sidecar files, secondary files containing data for another file.
Programs being XMP-aware, see the XMPs but [usually] do not show them; they take the info in them and apply them to the proper primary file.

Full support of XMP would mean that programs not only read from XMP, they write into them and carry it with the primary file for any other operation. You change the name of the primary file, in our case photos, and the XMP's name gets changed, too. You move the primary file from one location to another, the XMP goes with it. In the best of all worlds this would be implemented on OS level, so that all applications have to link into the API and done with it. Whatever program you then use for file manipulation, any other program would reflect the changes.

Alas, currently only very few programs do support XMP fully - and xMedia is not one of them, neither is Windows. Furthermore, xMedia cannot show XMPs, it is not among the importers. But you don't need them inside xMedia. It is faster and safer to use the Windows Explorer [or, I guess, Mac's Finder, though file format support is one of the major differences between the platforms] and delete the XMPs there.

Unless you need them for Lightroom ...

thanks for the tip, how do I go about deleting them in windows explore? where do I find XMP in windows explore? do I click on a photo & find it through the properties? I have windows XP home edition service pack 2. Do you think  it is worth going through my photos in windows to try to delete the XMP data?

Sossity
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Dierk
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« Reply #3 on: May 26, 2008, 11:44:48 PM »

Just like any other file, open the folder containing your files, switch to Symbol view. You should now be able to differentiate between NEFs - with Capture NX installed you see them as a grey rectangle with a dark grey/black globe in front, the globe shows NX, the abbrev NEF is shown top left - and XMPs [if they are linked to Adobe applications it's an Adobe style rectangle with a red bar and the letters XMP].

Select all XMPs and hit the <Del> button; next time you empty your Trash bin they are completely gone.

If you have no linked application for XMPs or NEFs, you should switch on the file extension under Extras-Folder Options->View.

Another method:

1. Start->Search->files and Folders
2. Enter '*.XMP' [without quotation marks] into the search field, set the search path to the hard drive your photos are saved to
3. Start the search
4. Very carefully go through the results list and delete those XMPs belonging to the photos


Caveats:

- If you use Lightroom or ACR for your RAW files you want to hold on to your XMPs. [I doubt you do that or you'd be in a bit of trouble]
- Only delete XMPs you are sure belong to a photo!

It is best to have dedicated photo folders, so you will only have photos and their sidecars in them.
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Dierk

IDimager on Windows XP/SP2; 3.2 GHz, 2 GB RAM, loads of storage space.
Other: Nikon D2x, Nikon D200, Capture NX 2, Adobe Creative Suite 3
Sossity Corby
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« Reply #4 on: May 27, 2008, 02:08:21 PM »

Just like any other file, open the folder containing your files, switch to Symbol view. You should now be able to differentiate between NEFs - with Capture NX installed you see them as a grey rectangle with a dark grey/black globe in front, the globe shows NX, the abbrev NEF is shown top left - and XMPs [if they are linked to Adobe applications it's an Adobe style rectangle with a red bar and the letters XMP].

Select all XMPs and hit the <Del> button; next time you empty your Trash bin they are completely gone.

If you have no linked application for XMPs or NEFs, you should switch on the file extension under Extras-Folder Options->View.

Another method:

1. Start->Search->files and Folders
2. Enter '*.XMP' [without quotation marks] into the search field, set the search path to the hard drive your photos are saved to
3. Start the search
4. Very carefully go through the results list and delete those XMPs belonging to the photos


Caveats:

- If you use Lightroom or ACR for your RAW files you want to hold on to your XMPs. [I doubt you do that or you'd be in a bit of trouble]
- Only delete XMPs you are sure belong to a photo!

It is best to have dedicated photo folders, so you will only have photos and their sidecars in them.

will this apply to me as I only have jpgs, no proprietary RAW camera files, I use a large zoom point & shot not a DSLR. Will I be able to find downloader pros XMP files attached to my jpegs? do I use the same procedure outlined here? or do I do something slightly different?

Thanks for your time so far

Sossity
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Dierk
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« Reply #5 on: May 27, 2008, 11:52:02 PM »

Same procedure, just exchange JPEG/JPG for RAW/NEF. The procedure outlined is the same for every kind of file, which you will surely see with a few more months working on a computer.
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Dierk

IDimager on Windows XP/SP2; 3.2 GHz, 2 GB RAM, loads of storage space.
Other: Nikon D2x, Nikon D200, Capture NX 2, Adobe Creative Suite 3
Sossity Corby
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Posts: 248


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« Reply #6 on: June 01, 2008, 03:09:13 PM »

Just like any other file, open the folder containing your files, switch to Symbol view. You should now be able to differentiate between NEFs - with Capture NX installed you see them as a grey rectangle with a dark grey/black globe in front, the globe shows NX, the abbrev NEF is shown top left - and XMPs [if they are linked to Adobe applications it's an Adobe style rectangle with a red bar and the letters XMP].

Select all XMPs and hit the <Del> button; next time you empty your Trash bin they are completely gone.

If you have no linked application for XMPs or NEFs, you should switch on the file extension under Extras-Folder Options->View.

Another method:

1. Start->Search->files and Folders

thanks for the tip, but I tried windows search & it did not turn up any .XMP files after it ran its search.
2. Enter '*.XMP' [without quotation marks] into the search field, set the search path to the hard drive your photos are saved to
3. Start the search
4. Very carefully go through the results list and delete those XMPs belonging to the photos


Caveats:

- If you use Lightroom or ACR for your RAW files you want to hold on to your XMPs. [I doubt you do that or you'd be in a bit of trouble]
- Only delete XMPs you are sure belong to a photo!

It is best to have dedicated photo folders, so you will only have photos and their sidecars in them.


[/quote

I tried running windows search as outlined but it did not turn up any results, thanks for the tip

Sossity
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