The DAM Forum
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
November 19, 2017, 06:55:50 AM

Login with username, password and session length
Search:     Advanced search
28031 Posts in 5146 Topics by 2907 Members
Latest Member: kbroch
* Home Help Search Login Register
+  The DAM Forum
|-+  Software Discussions
| |-+  Choosing Software/Other DAM Applications
| | |-+  ACDsee (Pro2 beta) now reads .dng embedded previews ...
« previous next »
Pages: [1] Print
Author Topic: ACDsee (Pro2 beta) now reads .dng embedded previews ...  (Read 5617 times)
David Grundy
Newbie
*
Posts: 2


View Profile WWW
« on: May 21, 2007, 05:18:43 AM »

ACDsee (Pro2 beta) now reads .dng embedded previews and is really trying hard to be a DAM system as well as everything else which ACDsee has always been.

Has anyone else had a look at this latest version of ACDsee?  After reading Peter's book I have just trialled IDimager, and was about to have a look at iView MP3, when I thought I'd swing past ACDsee again in search of something easier to comprehend.

Things have moved on a fair way since v7 which I currently use for some purposes.

If anyone else more knowledgeable than me has looked at this and found any major reason not to use this for DAM, I'd really appreciate hearing about it.  I like the interface and am quite hopeful (but trying not to be too optimistic!).

A few random comments on the ACDsee beta:
- My initial tests show that ACDsee apparently really does read the embedded preview and can display it at 100% or fitted to the preview window (or any other zoom).
- For some reason the ACDsee preview reflects changes to the .dng files made after initial cataloging, but the thumbnails don't.  I have posted this as an issue on the ACDsee forum dedicated to the beta.  [EDIT: This was a problem with my configuration, now fixed.]
- It also reads plenty of other raw files, but I doubt that ACR settings will be reflected in the previews.  I haven't tested this.
- So far, it seems one thing IDimager has which ACDsee Pro2 does not have is good support for versioning.
- It's possible to configure ACDsee so that ctrl+E opens files in Photoshop or ACR as appropriate.
- Photoshop files need to be saved with "maximise compatibility" on.
- ACDsee does not support unicode.  Unicode file names will cause crashes, and unicode metadata is displayed as " ? "
- It is a beta, and users are reporting various teething troubles.

Thanks
-David
« Last Edit: May 21, 2007, 10:07:13 AM by David Grundy » Logged
peterkrogh
Administrator
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 5682


View Profile Email
« Reply #1 on: May 21, 2007, 10:01:29 PM »

David,
Thanks for the information.
Peter
Logged
Marc Sabatella
Newbie
*
Posts: 41


View Profile Email
« Reply #2 on: May 22, 2007, 10:35:02 AM »

ACDsee (Pro2 beta) now reads .dng embedded previews and is really trying hard to be a DAM system as well as everything else which ACDsee has always been.

Has anyone else had a look at this latest version of ACDsee?  After reading Peter's book I have just trialled IDimager, and was about to have a look at iView MP3, when I thought I'd swing past ACDsee again in search of something easier to comprehend.

I've been playing with the new Pro 2 public beta quite a bit.  It's a free download, so anyone interested should check it out.

As a one-stop solution, I am very happy with it, but there are still some issues that will probably prevent most people on this forum from considering it.  I have been pushing *hard* (both in their public forums, where someone appointed me one of the moderators for some reason, and behind the scenes where possible) to get these addressed, as I think it is "this close" to being something that will be really exciting in the DAM world.  And while no one has made any promises, I know they *are* listening.

The biggest issues remaining have to do with DNG support.  The one that will be most problematic for people using Bridge/ACR or other RAW processing programs is that, while it will use the embedded preview and will read any IPTC info already present, it still will not *write* IPTC to DNG files.  I am quite confident that they now understand how important this is, and they have said they are considering whether they can get this into the final 2.0 release.  Personally, I am still content to keep my metadata in the database until they do get around to supporting writing it out to IPTC.  If nothing else, the database can be exported to text, so I am not worried about completely losing this information.

Also, while ACDSee will display the embedded preview, I am not sure it can be made to use it for everything you might want it used for - if you go to print, for example, or try to use the built-in editing capabilities in any way, it will do its own conversion, and of course it will not understand the processing you made elsewhere.

For those like me who are also using ACDSee for RAW processing, the biggest issue will be that ACDSee does not store an embedded preview or indeed any metadata (including RAW processing parameters) in the DNG file - it is all database only.  Again, I believe I have successfully made them aware of why this is an issue, but whether or not they get any enhancements into the final 2.0 is another matter.

On the positive side, the RAW processing parameters can be easily exported to text files, and of course JPEG's can be generated for the previews.  It seems to me all that would be needed - and this would probably be a fabulous thing in any event - would be a standalone utility capable of taking a JPEG preview and a XMP files and merging that information into a DNG file.  ACDSee's exported database info is currently not in XMP format, but that would probably be a very easy script to write.

All that said, the potential seems great to me.  This new version has made giant leaps in RAW processing, in terms of quality, speed and especially ease-of-use, with lots of batch processing options (and background processing).  Also a very impressive Local Contrast Enhancement feature in the built-in editor.  The overall experience of using it somewhat similar to Lightroom, from what I gather (I haven't yet tried LR), but it is reported to be generally faster and easier to use.  At least with respect to RAW - it doesn't do non-destructive JPEG processing.

Your other observations seem spot on, also - it is true ACDSee will not understand ACR adjustment settings, ACDSee has no no versioning support and no Unicode support.  So for some people, these will be factors.  But I suspect quite a number of people will not care about that.
Logged
David Grundy
Newbie
*
Posts: 2


View Profile WWW
« Reply #3 on: May 22, 2007, 06:25:37 PM »

Thanks Marc

You probably realised from my earlier comments that I also think this is looking pretty close to being something really good.

I hadn't got as far as testing whether it would write IPTC to DNGs - I'm still struggling with the whole metadata bit and have never been organised on this front in the past.  It's good to know about this limitation.  I'd love to see more people trial the product, and make it clear to the developers that full support for DNGs is important.

Unicode isn't a big deal for me (but I thought it's worth letting people know), but I think versioning support would be very nice to have.  I can't see any possibility of completely my relying on the ACDsee editor though, since I use layers and masking from time to time.  Still, I was surprised to see that it's apparently now 16-bit capable, and that colour management arrived sometime in the last two major version updates.

-David
Logged
Marc Sabatella
Newbie
*
Posts: 41


View Profile Email
« Reply #4 on: July 04, 2007, 12:48:08 PM »

For anyone interested, I would like to inform you that ACDSee Pro 2 is now on it the second release of its public beta, with a number of fixes and improvements over the first beta.  Most significantly for folks on this forum, they have now added the ability to write IPTC info to XMP sidecars for RAW files.  Unfortunately, it appears this feature has been disabled for DNG, although I have been to workaround this quite effectively by temporarily renaming the file to another RAW extension before generating the sidecar.  I have also verified that the XMP file that is generated can be read by the Adobe DNG converter and incorporated into the DNG file it outputs, meaning there *is* now a path to getting your IPTC metadata into your DNG files, even if it is a bit awkward.  For folks interested in using ACDSee Pro 2 as an all-in-one-solution, this may be good enough - who cares if it is a bit awkward to get your IPTC metadata into the DNG file itself if it isn't something you need to except in the relatively rare cases where you need more interoperability.  At least one no longer has to be worried about one's metadata being permanently locked up in the database.

BTW, I do not know if there is a specific reason that the sidecar feature is disabled for DNG or if this was an oversight, but I do know that the possibility of writing IPTC directly to DNG files is being strongly considered for the final release of the product, so I suppose one can hope that this is why they are not bothering to support writing sidecars for DNG - this feature would become unnecessary if the application can write to sidecars directly.  However, it is also worth noting that while the XMP sidecar feature works for any IPTC field supported by ACDSee that exists in the XMP core schema, and the info is indeed stored in proper XMP format (this is also, from what I understand, true of IPTC info stored directly in JPEG and other formats), ACDSee still does not support the full set of such fields - basically, just the legacy fields.

Overall, my impression after continuing to spend time with the Pro 2 beta is that the inability to use the embedded preview in DNG and other RAW files for anything but preview will mean that folks using ACR or another RAW processing application and hoping to ACDSee for all their DNG cataloging needs will be a bit disappointed.  You'll still need another application to do things like generate web galleries from the DNG/RAW files using the embedded previews, and I have no idea if that is something that is likely to be addressed by the final release.

On the other hand, folks who are shooting JPEG, or who are in the habit of generating JPG or TIFF conversions of their RAW files and then doing most of their day-to-day work on the conversions, or who are comfortable with simply using ACDSee's own integrated RAW processor, will probably find ACDSee works quite well for them.  It is a quite easy to use and reasonably full featured application for the price.  Lack of stacking or version control features are probably its main competitive disadvantage for this type of usage, but its advantages in so many other areas may make up for these limitations.
Logged
Pages: [1] Print 
« previous next »
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!