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Which Date Field
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Author Topic: Which Date Field  (Read 5725 times)
Niall Horley
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« on: March 19, 2007, 03:05:42 AM »

We IIP ingests the photo's which Date field is it using to name the directories. Does it come from the exif data or the files time stamps? or does it depend upon the file type.

The reason I asked is that my Dad forgot to change the time on his camera, when he was in New Zealand so a days shoot was splitting across to directories. I corrected exif data using exiftool, but the files were then moved using IIP they were going into directories with todays date on, which corresponeded to the last changed time. I then had to down load another tool to set the modified time back to the created time.


After a lot of hastle it is now working, the morale  of the story is to make sure the time on the camera is correct, its a lot less hastle.

Niall
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Niall Horley
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peterkrogh
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« Reply #1 on: March 19, 2007, 05:33:50 AM »

Niall,
IIP uses the File info, not EXIF. This is one thing that makes it fast.
You're right that you need the camera to be set right.
Peter
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Niall Horley
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« Reply #2 on: March 19, 2007, 07:12:57 AM »

I guessed it was, but there was also a mathching date in the exif information. Thinking about it, the support required to open up all the different raw files and extract the data would be imense and as you pointed out, really slow the processing down. At least I was able to correct the exif and then reset the modified date on the file easily.

Niall
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Niall Horley
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Marc Rochkind
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« Reply #3 on: March 19, 2007, 07:16:08 AM »

Niall--

Peter is right. {@datetime} is the modification date/time of the file, and {@exif.datetime} is the EXIF DateTimeOriginal.

One way to fix file names with the wrong date/time is to use the Multi-Camera Shoot feature, with only the folder containing the badly-named file selected. That feature allows you to correct the modification date/times and then re-ingest.

--Marc
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peterkrogh
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« Reply #4 on: March 19, 2007, 07:46:35 AM »

Marc,
When you use that feature, I assume it is adjusting the Date Modified field of the file, and that the EXIF date would be left unchanged.
Peter
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Marc Rochkind
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« Reply #5 on: March 19, 2007, 07:58:56 AM »

Peter--

Yes. IIP never changes anything inside the file.

--Marc
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Niall Horley
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« Reply #6 on: March 19, 2007, 12:52:48 PM »

Niall--

Peter is right. {@datetime} is the modification date/time of the file, and {@exif.datetime} is the EXIF DateTimeOriginal.


I wish I had know it was a s easy as {@exif.datetime}, as I knew which files were wrong, I had already corrected the time the photo was taken.

with {@exif.datetime} I assume the ingestion will be slower as you are reading the exif data, can you extract this information from raw files?

niall
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Niall Horley
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Marc Rochkind
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« Reply #7 on: March 19, 2007, 09:48:13 PM »

It's easy to extract the EXIF data from JPEGs, DNGs, non-DNG raws, and TIFFs, as all are based on a variant of TIFF. I have pretty robust code to do that in ImageVerifier, and I plan on moving it into IIP. Currently, IIP uses dcraw, an open source program, which also seems to be pretty robust for this purpose, although a problem for IIP is that the error handling is inadequate. That's why I'm replacing it

I've noticed some images whose DateTimeOriginal has been reset by some processing app (to be the same as DateTime in the header), leaving DateTimeDigitzed alone. So, I think I should in the future redefine exif.datetime to be DateTimeDigitized. Or, better, offer a whole collection of EXIF macros.

It is slower, because the file has to be read, but not all of the file. I haven't measured the comparative times, but such a test would be very easy to run.

--Marc
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Niall Horley
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« Reply #8 on: March 20, 2007, 03:43:52 AM »

Last night I ingested about 500 jpg's from 4 years ago, I had to resort to using the exif.datetime macro as I had edited some of the Photos and their timestamps had been updated. I did not notice any real performance drop off, I would guess that the disc access would be the limiting factor when this many files are involved.

Access to the DateTimeDigitized seams like a good aide as I guess most software would leave that alone.

Niall
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Niall Horley
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