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Anybody geotagging?
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Author Topic: Anybody geotagging?  (Read 56543 times)
Jean-François Schmitz
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« Reply #15 on: March 07, 2007, 08:15:47 AM »

On a PC I use RoboGEO wich works pretty well, especially with Garmin receivers which are supported natively.

The key is to synchronize the clocks of your camera and your receiver, which can be done very simply by taking a pic of your receiver showing the date and time. In the tool, after having loaded your pics and the GPS tracklog, you can simply synchronize them by selecting the pic with the time, and enter that time in the tool, which will then calculate the time offset between camera and receiver.

Once this is done, you can write the GPS data to the EXIF fields, tag the image itself, export the track plus pictures to Google Earth and Google Maps, etc...

It works with JPG, TIFF, PNG and even DNG (though I did not yet test the latter), but not the native RAW formats.

Anyway, it's pretty cool, I use is often to tag pictures I've taken while geocaching. Because of course, a prerequisite is that you have your GPS receiver with you - and switched on ;-) - all the time you are taking pictures. You can view some examples of tagged pictures here.

If you use OziExplorer on a PC, there is a similar but less sophisticated tool,   OziPhotoTool that will do similar stuff for viewing in OziExplorer, but will not write to the EXIF tags.

Jean-François
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Jean-François Schmitz
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« Reply #16 on: March 07, 2007, 08:57:16 AM »

And here is an example of what can be done in Google Maps: Euro Space Center.

Try to find the picture that I used to synchronize the camera and receiver  :Smiley
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Dierk
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« Reply #17 on: March 07, 2007, 09:27:45 AM »

Among the PR debris pre-PMA I found an interesting thingy from German company JOBO:
http://www.imaging-resource.com/EVENTS/PMAS07/1173138994.html

If it is available [JOBO's Giga Vault Pro evolution anybody?] and if it works as easily as it is described, it's a near perfect solution for all those cameras that cannot be connected directly to a GPS receiver. It also shows Nikon that it is possible to come up with intelligent solutions. The only real fault I find is the complete reliance on the hot-shoe and the camera's syncing. Probably there will be an adaptor solution, too.
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Dierk

IDimager on Windows XP/SP2; 3.2 GHz, 2 GB RAM, loads of storage space.
Other: Nikon D2x, Nikon D200, Capture NX 2, Adobe Creative Suite 3
Jean-François Schmitz
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« Reply #18 on: March 07, 2007, 10:43:51 AM »

As far as I understand from the press release, that JOBO stuff actually is a standalone GPS that stays in standby, sleep mode (to save batteries) and wakes up when it gets a signal from the flash hot-shoe that a picture is being taken. I don't think (but I might be wrong) that it does other syncing, like clock, and certainly not GPS data transfer to the camera body.

Other than that, the post processing is the same: once back home, you download the GPS positioning data from the device, and then you sync it with the pictures.

This makes me think that all those solutions available today boil down to the quality/completeness of the accompanying software.

So the choice is yours. Either you don't know anything about GPS, and you don't want to know  Wink, and you go for such a device, or Sony's GPS-CS1, or, like me, you are already a GPS geek, and you find a cheap solution to sync your receivers' tracklog with your picture.

 :Smiley Wink Cheesy
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DanZemke
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« Reply #19 on: March 07, 2007, 03:08:47 PM »

Dierk,

Thanks very much for the information about the JOBO PhotoGPS.  If I could buy it today, I would.

Having the camera embed the coordinates in the raw files would be ideal, but that is not an option for current Canon shooters.  So this looks like a better solution than the alternatives.  It probably has better battery life and/or is smaller/lighter than the continuous data loggers.  And unlike using a normal portable GPS, there is no separate button to press (or forget to press).  Also, it has a USB interface, rather than the old serial style (don't have a serial port on my notebook).  For $150, I'm sold.  Hope it uses a SiRFstar III chip (faster fix and better sensitivity than the older 12 channel GPS devices).

Dan

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Dierk
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« Reply #20 on: March 08, 2007, 12:33:18 AM »

Jean-Francois, the difference between current devices and the JOBO [on paper] is that it comes with its own software developed specifically to get the track data into your photo file. Not only that, syncing is automatic, track point recording with the photo is automatic, and the software does what is the next logical step - as I've outlined before I knew about the JOBO - getting the names of places from a database, writing them into the appropriate IPTC fields. Quite impressive!

Of course it is not a perfect solution, but Nikon's way of tagging directly isn't either. Last week I went out with my Garmin 72 cabled to the D2x; I've compacted the cable behind the very big Garmin, then used a rubber band to fix the whole big bundle to the lowest part of my UPstrap [quick release]. The whole set-up is actually easier to handle than it looks - until you put on your 10.5 mm Fisheye. Personally I like to concentrate on framing a good and sensible picture, especially with a Fisheye, alas, you have to be extra careful with the lower left corner as the cable has a way to creep in.

The other downside is Nikon's stupid 10-pin connector, which will not hold on its own unless you screw it in, which is a major hassle. And if you use two GPS-ready cameras you'll either miss shots or have to come to grips that only one has the GPS data [third option suits Nikoan and Garmin: get a second GPS receiver with all the necessary cables].

Eventually two solutions will come up:

1. Bluetooth in GPS-ready cameras, allowing any BT GPS receiver to link up. The camera's processor will then take the track point data from the receiver whenever a photo is taken. I have seen several Nikon photographers on the Net who build their own BT receiver for Nikon's 10-pin connector.
2. Professional and semi-professionl [probably even most other, too] cameras will have their own GPS device in the camera. Since the actual GPS chips are very small and the antenna doesn't need to be particularly big, no problem at all.

For the time being the JOBO seems to be the best there is. Hope it supports RAW ...
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Dierk

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Other: Nikon D2x, Nikon D200, Capture NX 2, Adobe Creative Suite 3
Jean-François Schmitz
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« Reply #21 on: March 08, 2007, 02:01:34 AM »

Hi Dierk,

What you say is exactly what I meant   Wink  - for the moment being, it all boils down to software - unless you are the happy owner of a body that takes GPS data from some source and embeds it automatically at the time the picture is being shot.

I own a Canon EOS30D, and I have a Garmin GPSMap 60 CSx as well. So in my case, the easiest is to clip the GPS device on by belt, or put it inside my backpack or Lowerpro bag, and just forget about it (its SiRF III chip is so sensitive that it keeps satellite track even in the car or inside a plane, no worries  Cheesy). It lives about 20 hours on two rechargeable AA batteries. No wiring or bluetooth needed between camera and GPS receiver. As the receiver continuously keeps a tracklog, there is no need to actually take a waypoint at each location where you take a picture. And it's immediate, wheras the JOBO needs to be awaken from it "sleep" mode, which, according to the release, can take a couple of seconds. 

Once back home, I process to pictures and produce JPGs. I connect the GPSMap to my PC, fire up RoboGEO, and in 30 secs I read in the pictures, the tracklog from the receiver, and that's it. After I've saved the project, I could actually delete the tracklog in the receiver (though I always back it up anyways  Wink). The project can be reloaded at any time to process the pics, generate Google maps, etc...

Other advantage of this solution: if you have several cameras, you can geotag the pictures of all of them, at least if they stay relatively close together  :Smiley For instance, if my kids accompany me and they take pics with my good old Ixus 400, those can be geotagged as well.

As mentionned in another thread, GPS accuracy today is down to about 10 meters, even 3 meters with WAAS (thanks to Bill Clinton who forced the US Army to disable the intentional degradation of civilian GPS frequencies). This means in practice, that the positioning error might be as "large" as 30 (10 in WAAS) meters. Enough to point you to the wrong side of the road or the brook, yet more than acceptable in 99% of applications.

As said in an earlier post, I see a clear benefit of the JOBO and Sony stuff for GPS neophytes that don't want to invest in more sophisticated GPS gear.
 
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Dierk
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« Reply #22 on: March 08, 2007, 04:28:06 AM »

I am currently gathering more info on the photoGPS but ATM lack definite word on several aspects, e.g. support of RAW. It looks like JOBO's device will support RAW but I still wait for the final word; flash use will be dealt with, at least the devlopers spoke about it. On both accounts [if they turn out to be 100%, not just the relatively stable 80% now] photoGPS beats all other software and hardware solutions on the market. It will already do so on account of getting place names into files. Power consumption, BTW, is one of the main goals for the developers. As for GPS chip, it seems to be the SiRF III.

Take all this with a grain of salt [see first sentence].

[Edit]
Just talked to JOBO again. photGPS supports RAW files via an XML sidecar; like most other companies they do not want to be held reliable for any file corruption, hence do not write into RAWs directly.
I guess those interested will have seen the PMA-video on Imaging Resource with the interview on the photoGPS. I won't rehash anything more from that.
« Last Edit: March 09, 2007, 03:16:49 AM by Dierk » Logged

Dierk

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Other: Nikon D2x, Nikon D200, Capture NX 2, Adobe Creative Suite 3
peterkrogh
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« Reply #23 on: March 10, 2007, 08:54:59 PM »

Dierk,
This thing looks pretty cool.
As I have been playing around with direct GPS data writing on the Nikon, I have come to appreciate that it may just be a better practice to track waypoints than to direct sync, at least until we get GPS built in to each camera.  Multi-camera usage and no signal areas could be addressed by the waypoint approach.

The XML sidecar approach is reasonable, as long as there is a way to get the data into a DAM solution, and durably attach it to the image file.  Which brings up...

As part of the DAM functionality, we also need an easy way to strip just the GPS data.  Clicking on the GPS data in Lightroom, and having Google Earth take me to my driveway was a little unnerving in some ways. 

I assume we'll all get used to it, in the same way that cell phone functionality was disconcerting the first time it intruded on a camping trip.  Later, that "intrusion" came to seem nearly indispensable, for any number of reasons.

Peter
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Dierk
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« Reply #24 on: March 11, 2007, 01:36:23 AM »

You are right, under some circumstances embedded GPS data are problematic. That's the trade-off of information gathering: anything that helps us may help some government body or criminal. OTOH, when I sent photos out I have everything in hand to strip unwanted data [particularly since MediaPro's very annoying bug about EXIF/GPS data in regard to Convert is still there].
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Dierk

IDimager on Windows XP/SP2; 3.2 GHz, 2 GB RAM, loads of storage space.
Other: Nikon D2x, Nikon D200, Capture NX 2, Adobe Creative Suite 3
peterkrogh
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« Reply #25 on: March 11, 2007, 07:28:18 AM »

What's that bug?
Peter
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Dierk
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« Reply #26 on: March 12, 2007, 12:36:36 AM »

EXIF/GPS data do not always arrive in my JPEG and TIFF conversions although I tagged the option to preserve them.
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Dierk

IDimager on Windows XP/SP2; 3.2 GHz, 2 GB RAM, loads of storage space.
Other: Nikon D2x, Nikon D200, Capture NX 2, Adobe Creative Suite 3
peterkrogh
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« Reply #27 on: March 12, 2007, 07:41:15 AM »

Dierk,
Have you been able to figure out a pattern on the dropped data?
Peter
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Dierk
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« Reply #28 on: March 12, 2007, 07:59:47 AM »

No, not yet.

When I started to answer you this morning, I went into MP to recreate the steps [university education is hard to beat out of me]. To my big surprise it worked this time. That's why I had to change to 'not always'.
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Dierk

IDimager on Windows XP/SP2; 3.2 GHz, 2 GB RAM, loads of storage space.
Other: Nikon D2x, Nikon D200, Capture NX 2, Adobe Creative Suite 3
David
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« Reply #29 on: September 27, 2007, 08:22:28 PM »

Hi all

Geotagging with Mac OS X

Here is how I do my geotagging on my Intel duo core iMac and it works well

Hardware: Garmin eTrex Vista HCx (USB connection)
Software:

1) Download tracklog from my GPS using LoadMyTracks   (http://www.cluetrust.com/LoadMyTracks.html)
2) Ingest the photos with ImageIngester - I could not get ImageIngester to read the .gpx track log)
3) Merge location info into EXIF header using GPSPhotoLinker http://oregonstate.edu/~earlyj/gpsphotolinker/
4) The rest of the DAM workflow

The iMac and LoadMyTracks recognizes the eTrex Vista (although none of the Garmin map software works on the Mac).

Hope this helps someone

David
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